Marine Biotechnology

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 148–151 | Cite as

Tensile and Tear Strength of Carrageenan Film from Philippine Eucheuma Species

  • Annabelle V. Briones
  • Wilhelmina O. Ambal
  • Romulo R. Estrella
  • Rolando Pangilinan
  • Carlos J. De Vera
  • Raymund L. Pacis
  • Ner Rodriguez
  • Merle A. Villanueva
Article

Abstract

The tensile and tear strength of carrageenan film from Philippines Eucheuma species were investigated using NEC tensilon universal-testing machine according to American Society for Testing Materials methods. These properties are important for assessing carrageenan film as packaging material. The κ and ι types were used in the study. The effect of glycerine on the tensile and tear strength including elongation was also evaluated. Addition of glycerine tended to lower the tensile strength of the film and increase its elongation properties including the tear strength. Carrageenan film without glycerine was much stronger. Glycerine made the film more flexible and easy to deform. The composite film of carrageenan and konjac gum did not exhibit elongation. It also showed higher tensile strength than did the composite film of carrageenan and xanthan gum. Compared with ι-type carrageenan film, κ-type carrageenan film without glycerine was more comparable to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film in terms of tensile strength as was the composite film of carrageenan–konjac gum. The κ-type carrageenan film with glycerine was more comparable to LDPE film in terms of tear strength. The elongation reading for carrageenan film was lower than that for LDPE film. Morphologic studies showed that the carrageenan film had sets of pores distributed randomly at different places as compared to LDPE film. It also showed that the carrageenan film was more fibrous than LDPE film.

Keywords

carrageenan tensile strength tear strength elongation reading elastic modulus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annabelle V. Briones
    • 1
  • Wilhelmina O. Ambal
  • Romulo R. Estrella
  • Rolando Pangilinan
  • Carlos J. De Vera
  • Raymund L. Pacis
  • Ner Rodriguez
  • Merle A. Villanueva
  1. 1.Department of Science and TechnologyIndustrial Technology Development Institute, DOST Compound, Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan, Taguig, Metro ManilaPhilippines

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