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Population dynamics and crude oil degrading ability of bacterial consortia of isolates from oil-contaminated sites in Nigeria

Abstract

Application of bacterial consortium of hydrocarbon degraders to crude oil–contaminated site can enhance bioremediation. This study evaluated the population dynamics and crude oil degradation abilities of various consortia developed from bacterial strains isolated from crude oil–contaminated sites using crude oil–supplemented Bushnell Haas media. Each consortium consisted of three bacterial strains and was designated as Consortium A (Serratia marcescens strain N4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain N3R, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain W11), B (Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain N3R, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain W11, Pseudomonas protegens strain P7), C (Serratia marcescens strain N4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain W11, Pseudomonas protegens strain P7), and D (Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain W15, Providencia vermicola strain W8, Serratia marcescens strain W13). There was progressive decline in the populations of Serratia marcescens strains in the consortia as the incubation period progressed. This may have led to reduction in their synergistic contribution and, subsequently, total degradation ability of crude oil by the consortia. The gravimetric analyses showed that Consortium D produced the highest % crude oil degradation of 29.66% compared to Consortia A, B, and C with 23.73%, 11.86%, and 19.49% respectively. Based on gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analyses, Consortium D produced the highest percentage total petroleum hydrocarbon degradation of 73.65% compared to 68.24%, 68.94%, and 69.19% produced by Consortia A, B, and C respectively. The biodegradation potential of Consortium D also demonstrates the significance of using isolates from the same isolation site in development of consortium for bioremediation.

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All data generated and analyzed during this study are included in this published article (and its supplementary information files).

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Acknowledgements

We appreciate the scientific contributions and suggestions offered during this work research by the academic staff of the Department of Microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. We also appreciate Eng. Nnabuife A. of Standard Organization of Nigeria, for the moral support and encouragement given as well as contributions in organizing the results obtained during this research which avoided many errors.

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NO: conceptualization, resources, methodology, investigation, data curation, formal analysis, visualization, writing- original draft, writing—review and editing. OJ: conceptualization, methodology, validation, writing—review and editing, project administration, visualization. AC: methodology, supervision, validation, visualization. IA: visualization, supervision, formal analysis.

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Correspondence to Obianuju Obiajulu Nnabuife.

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Nnabuife, O.O., Ogbonna, J.C., Anyanwu, C. et al. Population dynamics and crude oil degrading ability of bacterial consortia of isolates from oil-contaminated sites in Nigeria. Int Microbiol 25, 339–351 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10123-021-00224-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10123-021-00224-7

Keywords

  • Consortia
  • Hydrocarbon
  • Biodegradation
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Serratia marcescens