The inhibitory effect of Ulva fasciata on culturability, motility, and biofilm formation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC17802

Abstract

The outbreak of vibriosis from Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) is one of common pathogenic diseases found in the mariculture environment. In this study, the inhibitory effect of Ulva fasciata (U. fasciata) on the culturability, motility, and biofilm formation of V. parahaemolyticus ATCC17802 was examined by co-culturing system. Results showed that both of secretion and live tissue of U. fasciata could convert culturable V. parahaemolyticus ATCC17802 to non-culturable, both reaching more than 99% of inhibition rate after 3-day co-culture, and higher density (12 g L−1) of U. fasciata exhibited stronger inhibition. The twitching behavior of V. parahaemolyticus ATCC17802 was more easily affected by U. fasciata than the swimming behavior after 3-day co-culture, with the inhibitory rates varying at the ranges of 1.70–30.29% (twitching behavior) and 10.06–44.86% (swimming behavior) under the different environmental factors (salinity, NO3-N and PO43−-P concentrations), but no significant correlation was found. The greatest inhibition effect on V. parahaemolyticus ATCC17802 biofilm formation occurred at 12 h, with inhibition rates at the range of 11.03–67.10 %, while there was still no significant correlation between inhibition rate and the three environmental factors. The different environmental factors might induce U. fasciata to excrete different levels of secondary metabolites, which caused the various inhibitory effect on the cultivability, motility, and biofilm formation of V. parahaemolyticus ATCC17802.

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Acknowledgments

The work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51709236).

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Qiao, Y., Jia, R., Luo, Y. et al. The inhibitory effect of Ulva fasciata on culturability, motility, and biofilm formation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC17802. Int Microbiol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10123-021-00165-1

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Keywords

  • Ulva fasciata
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus
  • Culturability
  • Motility
  • Biofilm formation
  • Inhibitory effect