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Radio frequency–induced superoxide accumulation affected the growth and viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Abstract

With the development of the electric technologies, the biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) were widely studied. However, the results remain controversial and the biophysical mechanisms are still unknown. To our knowledge, little studies pay attention to the radio frequency (RF) of 2.6–5 MHz. In the present study, we investigated the effect of these radio frequencies on the growth and cell viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at very low power density below 0.1 mT. The result appeared to be time-dependent. The growth of the yeast cells was obviously affected by the RF-EMF with a 43.5% increase when exposed for 30 h, and the growth-promoting effect decreased along with the radiation time and eventually turned to an inhibiting effect retarding growth by 20.7% at 89 h. The cell viability was improved to 70.1% at 8 h and reduced by 33.5% at 28 h. The superoxide accumulated in exposed cells as radiation time increased which may lead to the inhibition of viability and growth of the cells. However, the efficient frequency, power density, and exposure dosage await further investigation. Nevertheless, the wave band studied in this research is effective to produce biological effect, and therefore, it may provide an optional new radio frequency which is valuable for the development and utilization in therapy technique and medical use.

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Acknowledgments

The authors sincerely thank Dr. Xuemei Bai for the help of English revision.

Funding

The work was supported by ENN Group.

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Correspondence to Hong Wu.

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Li, Q., Tian, M., Teng, J. et al. Radio frequency–induced superoxide accumulation affected the growth and viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Int Microbiol 23, 391–396 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10123-019-00111-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10123-019-00111-2

Keywords

  • Radio frequency
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae
  • Growth
  • Viability
  • Superoxide