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Lasers in Medical Science

, Volume 33, Issue 6, pp 1371–1379 | Cite as

Clinical application of multicolour scanning laser imaging in diabetic retinopathy

  • Shuting Li
  • Xiangning Wang
  • Xinhua Du
  • Qiang Wu
Original Article
  • 717 Downloads

Abstract

To compare the visualization of the lesions of diabetic retinopathy (DR) using multicolour scanning laser imaging (MSLI) and conventional colour fundus photography (CFP). The paired images of diabetic patients who underwent same-day MSLI and CFP examinations were reviewed. Combined multicolour (MC) images were acquired simultaneously using three laser wavelengths: blue reflectance (BR, λ = 488 nm), green reflectance (GR, λ = 518 nm) and infrared reflectance (IR, λ = 820 nm). The number of positive DR lesions was calculated using fundus fluorescein angiography as the reference standard. The visibility of the microaneurysms (Mas) was graded using a scale, and the number of Mas for each method was counted by two masked readers. Eighty eyes of 42 diabetic patients were included. The average grading score for Mas visualization was significantly higher with MC (1.50 ± 0.71) and GR (1.55 ± 0.69) than with CFP (0.95 ± 0.81). The average number of Mas was also significantly higher with MC (11.41 ± 14.02) and GR (11.93 ± 13.43) than with CFP (6.43 ± 9.39). The number of positive Mas, diabetic macular edema (DME) and epiretinal membranes (ERM) were significantly higher with MC than CFP (P < 0.05), while the numbers of cotton wool spots, haemorrhages, hard exudates, venous beading and abnormal new vessels were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Mas and ERM were most effectively detected on GR images, and an elevated greenish shift was clearly visualized in patients with DME on the MC images. MSLI can effectively visualize Mas and other pathological lesions of DR compared with CFP. MSLI with superior resolution may be a useful complement for DME and ERM detection.

Keywords

Multicolour scanning laser imaging Colour fundus photography Fluorescein angiography Diabetic retinopathy Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope 

Abbreviations

ART

automatic real-time

BR

blue reflectance

CFP

colour fundus photography

cSLO

confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

CWS

cotton wool spots

DM

diabetes mellitus

DME

diabetic macular edema

DR

diabetic retinopathy

ERM

epiretinal membrane

FPE

fibrous proliferations

GR

green reflectance

HEs

hard exudates

IR

infrared reflectance

IRH

intraretinal haemorrhages

IRMA

intraretinal microvascular abnormalities

Mas

microaneurysms

MC

multicolour

MSLI

multicolour scanning laser imaging

NV

neovascularization

PRH

preretinal haemorrhages

SD-OCT

spectral domain optical coherence tomography

VB

venous beading

VL

vascular loops

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Grant NO.16DZ0501100).

Compliance with ethical standards

This work was supported by the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Grant NO.16DZ0501100). The study protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital and follows the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki for experimentation on humans. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. The study was registered in the Chinese clinical trial registry (http://www.chictr.org.cn/, Registration number: ChiCTR-OOC-16010160).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyShanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s HospitalShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes MellitusShanghaiChina

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