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Lasers in Medical Science

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 683–688 | Cite as

Pulsed dye laser on ecchymoses: clinical and histological assessment

  • Adrián Alegre-Sánchez
  • D. Saceda-Corralo
  • G. Segurado-Miravalles
  • D. de Perosanz-Lobo
  • P. Fonda-Pascual
  • O. M. Moreno-Arrones
  • D. Buendía-Castaño
  • B. Perez-García
  • P. Boixeda
Brief Report

Introduction

Ecchymoses occur due to local haemorrhages with red blood cell (RBC) extravasation into soft tissues. It can develop after a trauma, a surgical procedure, a cosmetic procedure or even spontaneously, especially in patients taking anticoagulant drugs or with coagulation alterations. Moreover, the prevalence of this condition is on the rise due to the increasing use of chronic anticoagulation therapies.

Although ecchymoses resolve spontaneously, the associated discoloration might persist up to 2 weeks in some cases. This situation represents a potential social impairment due to cosmetic concerns, mainly in those patients with extensive bruises affecting non-covered areas. Therefore, the effective and safe treatment of ecchymoses would have an emotionally, socially and even economically positive impact.

Many therapeutic approaches have been tried in order to treat or prevent ecchymoses, most of them with poor results. Contradictory results have been found in studies testing...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrián Alegre-Sánchez
    • 1
  • D. Saceda-Corralo
    • 1
  • G. Segurado-Miravalles
    • 1
  • D. de Perosanz-Lobo
    • 1
  • P. Fonda-Pascual
    • 1
  • O. M. Moreno-Arrones
    • 1
  • D. Buendía-Castaño
    • 1
  • B. Perez-García
    • 1
  • P. Boixeda
    • 1
  1. 1.Dermatology DepartmentRamon y Cajal HospitalMadridSpain

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