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Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 1047–1060 | Cite as

Thermodynamic performance analysis of three solid oxide fuel cell and gas microturbine hybrid systems for application in auxiliary power units

  • Jamasb Pirkandi
  • Mehdi Jahromi
  • Seyedeh Zeynab Sajadi
  • Mohammad Ommian
Original Paper
  • 79 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, three different configurations of a solid oxide fuel cell and gas microturbine hybrid system are evaluated for application in auxiliary power units. The first configuration is a common hybrid system in auxiliary power units, utilizing a fuel cell stack in the structure of the gas turbine cycle. The other configurations use two series and parallel fuel cell stacks in the structure of the gas turbine cycle. The main purpose of this research is thermodynamic analysis, evaluation of the performance of the proposed hybrid systems in similar conditions, and selection of an appropriate system in terms of efficiency, power generation, and entropy generation rate. In this study, the utilized fuel cells were subjected to electrochemical, thermodynamic, and thermal analyses and their working temperatures were calculated under various working conditions. Results indicate that the hybrid system with two series stacks had maximum power generation and efficiency compared with the other two cases. Moreover, the simple hybrid system and the system with two parallel stacks had relatively equal pure power generation and efficiency. According to the investigations, hybrid system with two series fuel cell stacks, which had 3424 and 1712 cells, respectively, can achieve the electrical efficiency of over 48%. A hybrid system with two parallel fuel cell stacks, in which each stack had 2568 cells, had the electrical efficiency of 46.3%. Findings suggested that maximum electrical efficiency occurred between the pressure ratios of 5–6 in the proposed hybrid systems.

Keywords

Solid oxide fuel cell Microturbine Auxiliary power unit Entropy generation 

List of symbols

F

Faraday constant

f

Fuel-to-air ratio (\(\dot{m}_{\text{f}} /\dot{m}_{\text{a}}\))

h

Enthalpy (kJ/kmol)

I

Current (A)

\(i_{^\circ }\)

Exchange current density (A)

\(i_{\text{L}}\)

Limiting current density (A)

n

Molar flow rate (kmol/s)

ne

Number of electron mole

P

Pressure (kPa)

Q

Heat generation rate (kW)

r

Ohmic resistance

Ru

Universal gas resistance

S

Entropy (kJ/kmol K)

T

Temperature (K)

W

Electrical power (kW)

Greek letters

h

Efficiency

ε

Efficiency factor

Subscripts

a

Air

ab

Afterburner

ac

Alternating current

an

Anode

c

Compressor

ca

Cathode

cell

Fuel cell

dc

Direct current

ele

Electrical

elec

Electrochemical

f

Fuel

g

Gas

gen

Generation

gt

Gas turbine

in

Inlet

inv

Inverter

loss

Loss

net

Net

out

Exit

rec

Recuperator

surr

Surrounding

th

Thermal

tot

Total

Acronyms

APU

Auxiliary power unit

CHP

Combined heat and power

GT

Gas turbine

LHV

Low heating value (kJ/kmol)

SOFC

Solid oxide fuel cell

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jamasb Pirkandi
    • 1
  • Mehdi Jahromi
    • 1
  • Seyedeh Zeynab Sajadi
    • 1
  • Mohammad Ommian
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Aerospace EngineeringMalek Ashtar University of TechnologyTehranIran

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