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Alveolar echinococcosis in southern Belgium: retrospective experience of a tertiary center

  • Audrey Cambier
  • Philippe Leonard
  • Bertrand Losson
  • Jean-Baptiste Giot
  • Noëlla Bletard
  • Paul Meunier
  • Roland Hustinx
  • Nicolas Meurisse
  • Jean Delwaide
  • Pierre Honore
  • Marie-Pierre Hayette
  • Olivier Detry
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

Alveolar Echinococcosis (EA) is a zoonosis due to the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocuris. Humans are dead-end hosts and are exposed through sylvatic (fox) or domestic (cat and dog) cycles. Infection is acquired through the fecal-oral route. The metacestodes of E. multilocularis proliferate in the liver, inducing a “tumor-like” lesion that can invade the neighboring organs or spread away from the primary lesion [1].

Until recently, Belgium was considered as a low-risk country for AE. However, in 2008, Hanosset et al. demonstrated by necropsies of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), a prevalence of AE at up to 60% in some parts of Wallonia, the Southern part of Belgium [2]. The first indigenous Belgian human AE case was diagnosed in 1999 at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) of Liege, a tertiary university hospital in Wallonia [3]. Since this first case, other patients have been diagnosed with EA and managed by the different departments of the CHU...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical approval

This study was approved by the university’s research ethics board.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audrey Cambier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Philippe Leonard
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bertrand Losson
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jean-Baptiste Giot
    • 1
    • 2
  • Noëlla Bletard
    • 1
    • 4
  • Paul Meunier
    • 1
    • 5
  • Roland Hustinx
    • 1
    • 6
  • Nicolas Meurisse
    • 1
    • 7
  • Jean Delwaide
    • 1
    • 8
  • Pierre Honore
    • 1
    • 7
  • Marie-Pierre Hayette
    • 1
    • 9
  • Olivier Detry
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.ECHINO-LIEGECHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiègeBelgium
  2. 2.Department of InfectiologyCHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiegeBelgium
  3. 3.Department of Infectious and Parasitic DiseasesUniversity of Liege (ULg)LiegeBelgium
  4. 4.Department of PathologyCHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiegeBelgium
  5. 5.Department of RadiologyCHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiegeBelgium
  6. 6.Department of Nuclear MedicineCHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiegeBelgium
  7. 7.Department of Abdominal Surgery and TransplantationCHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiegeBelgium
  8. 8.Department of Hepato - GastroenterologyCHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiegeBelgium
  9. 9.Department of Clinical MicrobiologyCHU Liege (CHU-ULg)LiegeBelgium

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