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Procalcitonin as a predictor of severe appendicitis in children

  • D. A. Kafetzis
  • I. M. Velissariou
  • P. Nikolaides
  • M. Sklavos
  • M. Maktabi
  • G. Spyridis
  • D. D. Kafetzis
  • E. Androulakakis
Concise Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) in 212 children with appendicitis and compare it with that of the standard diagnostic modalities, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, leukocyte count, and abdominal ultrasound findings, in relation to the surgical and histological findings of the appendix. A PCT value of >0.5 ng/ml was found to be indicative of perforation or gangrene with 73.4% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity, a CRP level of >50 mg/l and a leukocyte count of >104/mm3 were useful diagnostic markers for perforation, while abdominal ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 82.8% and a specificity of 91.2% for detecting appendicitis with imaging findings. PCT measurement seems to be a useful adjunctive tool for diagnosing acute necrotizing appendicitis or perforation, and surgical exploration will probably be required in patients with PCT values >0.5 ng/ml.

Keywords

Appendicitis Leukocyte Count Acute Appendicitis Procalcitonin Severe Bacterial Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. Kafetzis
    • 1
  • I. M. Velissariou
    • 1
  • P. Nikolaides
    • 2
  • M. Sklavos
    • 2
  • M. Maktabi
    • 2
  • G. Spyridis
    • 2
  • D. D. Kafetzis
    • 1
  • E. Androulakakis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Second Department of PediatricsUniversity of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.First Department of Pediatric SurgeryP. & A. Kyriakou Children’s HospitalAthensGreece

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