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Neurological Sciences

, Volume 39, Issue 4, pp 799–801 | Cite as

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with debut of a late onset coeliac disease—a case report

  • Jonas Alexander Jarholm
  • Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen
  • Christine Wohlleben
  • Svetozar Zarnovicky
  • Kashif Waqar Faiz
Letter to the Editor
  • 107 Downloads

Dear Editor,

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-medicated condition usually affecting children and younger adults, characterized by multiple demyelinating CNS lesions with a variable presentation of neurological symptoms such as encephalopathy, headache, and different focal neurological symptoms [1]. There is no specific test, and the diagnosis is based on clinical reasoning helped by neuroimaging, and exclusion of other relevant differential diagnosis. The most common causes suggested are recent infections and vaccinations. Monophasic clinical course is most common and associated with good prognosis. Higher age and recurrent episodes tends to be associated with higher morbidity and mortality. Steroids, immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and immunosuppressive medications are the most common treatment alternatives. A possible link between gluten-sensitivity and neurological symptoms has been suggested [2]. Here, we report the first case of ADEM possibly associated to...

Notes

Funding

This study was funded by the Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Norway.

Compliance with ethical standards

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l., part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurologyAkershus University HospitalLørenskogNorway
  2. 2.Department of General Practice, HelsamUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyAkershus University HospitalLørenskogNorway
  4. 4.Research CentreAkershus University HospitalLørenskogNorway

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