Advertisement

Neurological Sciences

, Volume 39, Issue 4, pp 773–775 | Cite as

A pyramid skull of an epileptic (1901). Anthropological diagnose of a positivistic physician

  • Marta Licata
Letter to the Editor

In the literature of Criminal Anthropology from the second half of the nineteenth century, we find several studies in which cranial malformation is linked to nervous mental diseases. In particular, in the Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, Criminal Anthropology and Related Sciences (original title: Rivista di Psichiatria Forense, Antropologia Criminale e Scienze Affini), discussions on epilepsy are reported [1, 2]. Pathology was already well known in antiquity as documented by historical sources [3, 4]. With this in mind, I want to recall a publication of a little known Italian physician-anthropologist Abele De Blasio (1858–1945) [5] in which the author highlighted the correlation between a seriously malformed skull and epilepsy. The article, entitled Pyramid skull in an epileptic, was published in 1901 [6]. The author morphologically described a skull of a woman who died at the age of 52 in the Hospital of Incurabili (Naples). The woman suffered from epileptic seizures in her early...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

The author certifies that this paper consists of original, unpublished work which is not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The author declares that the research does not involve human and animal participants.

The author confirms that the information on prior publication or the submission elsewhere of any part of the work are not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The author declares that she has no conflicts of interest.

The manuscript has been read and approved by the author.

The author offered her scientific expertise in the realization of research.

The author has no financial relationship relevant to this article to disclose.

References

  1. 1.
    Penta P (1900) Contributo clinico e medico legale alla conoscenza dei disturbi psichici della epilessia. Rivista di Psichiatria Forense, Antropologia Criminale e Scienze Affini 3:209–216, 245–253Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    De Blasio A (1900) Anomalie multiple in un cranio di prostituta. Rivista di Psichiatria Forense, Antropologia Criminale e Scienze Affini 3:293–301Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Grmek MD (1985) Le malattie all’alba della civiltà occidentale. Il mulino, BolognaGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Galassi FM, Ashrafian H (2016) Julius Caesar’s disease. A new diagnosis. Pen and Sword Books, LondonGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Borgo M, Martini M, Bragazzi NL, Paluan F, Vecchio I, Licata M (2017) Corpus loquens: the speaking body and Abele De Blasio (1858–1945). Act Med Medit 33:95–100Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    De Blasio A (1901) Cranio piramoide in una epilettica. Rivista di Psichiatria Forense, Antropologia Criminale e Scienze Affini 4:117–122Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Asadi-Pooya AA (2016) Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are predominantly seen in women: potential neurobiological reasons. Neurol Sci 37(6):851–855CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Esmail EH, Nawito AM, Labib DM, Basheer MA (2016) Focal interictal epileptiform discharges in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Neurol Sci 37(7):1071–1077CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Virchow R (1877) Beiträge zur physischen Anthropologie der Deutschen, mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der Friesen. Verlag, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    De Blasio A (1903) Cranio Acromegalico. Rivista di Psichiatria Forense, Antropologia Criminale e scienze affini 6:437–441Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Dalfardi B, Daneshfard B, Sarikhani S (2016) Craniosynostoses presenting as copper beaten skull appearance. Iran Red Med J 18(12):e27545Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    De Blasio A (1902) Cranio Trapanato del Paese degli Incas; Mummie e Crani dell’antico Perù. Rivista di Psichiatria Forense, Antropologia Criminale e Scienze Affini 5:41–50Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Appenzeller O, Stevens JM, Kruszynski R, Walker S (2001) Neurology in ancient faces. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 70(4):524–529CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre of Research of Osteoarchaeology and Paleopathology, Department of Biotechnology and Life SciencesUniversity of InsubriaVareseItaly

Personalised recommendations