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Neurological Sciences

, Volume 36, Issue 6, pp 833–843 | Cite as

A systematic review and meta-analysis of cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic therapy for depression in Parkinson’s disease patients

  • Cheng-Long Xie
  • Xiao-Dan Wang
  • Jie Chen
  • Hua-Zhen Lin
  • Yi-He Chen
  • Jia-Lin Pan
  • Wen-Wen WangEmail author
Review Article

Abstract

Numerous practice guidelines have recommended cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy as a treatment of choice for depression in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, no recent meta-analysis has examined the effects of brief psychotherapy (which includes both CBT and psychodynamic therapy) for adult depression in PD. We decided to conduct such a systematic review and meta-analysis. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of brief psychotherapy compared with control groups, other support nursing, or pharmacotherapy. The quality of included studies was strictly evaluated. Twelve studies including 766 patients met all inclusion criteria. The result showed that brief psychotherapy could evidently improve the HAMD (p < 0.00001) and Moca scale (p = 0.006). There was no statistical significance in PDQ-39 scale (p = 0.31). In the subgroup analysis by types of brief psychotherapy, the efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy was better than CBT (SMD = −2.02 vs SMD = −0.90) for the outcome measure according to HAMD scale. Meanwhile, we found brief psychotherapy in China was more effective than in US (SMD = −1.54 vs SMD = −1.23), and in low quality studies was more efficacious than in high quality studies (SMD = −1.50 vs SMD = −1.33). Time of brief psychotherapy treatment above 6 weeks was superior to studies with less than 6 weeks treatment. We found brief psychotherapy is probable effective in the management of depression in PD patients. But one reason to undermine the validity of findings is high clinical heterogeneity and low methodological quality of the included trials.

Keywords

Cognitive behavioral therapy Psychosocial treatments Parkinson’s disease Depression Systematic review Meta-analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge Wen–Wen Wang for his help in guiding and revising the manuscript. We also thank all the study participants. The author(s) received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheng-Long Xie
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiao-Dan Wang
    • 3
  • Jie Chen
    • 1
  • Hua-Zhen Lin
    • 1
  • Yi-He Chen
    • 4
  • Jia-Lin Pan
    • 4
  • Wen-Wen Wang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.The Center of Traditional Chinese MedicineThe Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children’s Hospital of Wenzhou Medical UniversityWenzhouChina
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyXinhua Hospital Affiliated to the Medical School of Shanghai Jiaotong UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyRuijin Hospital North Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  4. 4.The Center of CardiologyThe Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children’s Hospital of Wenzhou Medical UniversityWenzhouChina

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