Neurological Sciences

, Volume 29, Supplement 1, pp 149–151 | Cite as

Comorbidity between depressive symptoms and migraine: preliminary data from the Zabút Aging Project

  • Cecilia Camarda
  • Carmela Pipia
  • Antonia Taglialavori
  • Paola Di Fiore
  • Rosolino Camarda
  • Roberto Monastero
Oral Communication

Abstract

We evaluated the association between depressive symptoms and migraine using cross-sectional data from the Zabút Aging Project, a population-based study including subjects aged ≥50 years. A total of 1285 nonmigraineurs and 151 migraineurs were included. Diagnosis of migraine was carried out using the criteria of the International Headache Society. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) was used to score depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were clustered in four groups: depressed and positive affects, somatic activity and intrapersonal feelings. Migraineurs showed higher total and specific depressive symptoms than controls (p from 0.005 to <0.0001). Mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms (CES-D score of ≥16) were present in 47.2% of migraineurs compared to 15.8% of controls (p<0.0001). After adjustment for demographics, mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms were strongly associated with migraine (OR [95% CI]=4.7 [3.1–7.0]). This association significantly increased in males (OR [95% CI]=6.2 [2.8–14.6]). Depressive features represent highly frequent comorbid symptoms of adult-to-elderly migraineurs.

Keywords

Migraine Epidemiology Depression Elderly 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Breslau N, Lipton RB, Stewart WF, Schultz LR, Welch KM (2003) Comorbidity of migraine and depression: investigating potential etiology and prognosis. Neurology 60:1308–1312PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bigal ME, Lipton RB (2006) Modifiable risk factors for migraine progression. Headache 46:1334–1343PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Patel NV, Bigal ME, Kolodner KB, Leotta C, Lafata JE, Lipton RB (2004) Prevalence and impact of migraine and probable migraine in a health plan. Neurology 63:1432–1438PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Camarda R, Monastero R (2003) Prevalence of primary headaches in Italian elderly: preliminary data from the Zabút Aging Project. Neurol Sci 24[Suppl 2]:122–124Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (1988) Classification and diagnostic criteria for headache disorders, cranial neuralgias and facial pain. Cephalalgia 8(Suppl. 7):1–96Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Radloff LS (1977) The CES-D scale: a self-report depression scale for research in the general population. Applied Psychol Measurement 3:385–401CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kales HC, Maixner DF, Mellow AM (2005) Cerebrovascular disease and late-life depression. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 13:88–98PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Merikangas KR, Angst J, Isler H (1990) Migraine and psychopathology. Results of the Zurich cohort study of young adults. Arch Gen Psychiatry 47:849–853PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Swartz KL, Pratt LA, Armenian HK, Lee LC, Eaton WW (2000) Mental disorders and the incidence of migraine headaches in a community sample: results from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment area follow-up study. Arch Gen Psychiatry 57:945–950PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Zwart JA, Dyb G, Hagen K, Ødegård KJ, Dahl AA, Bovim G et al (2003) Depression and anxiety disorders associated with headache frequency. The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. Eur J Neurol 10:147–152PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cecilia Camarda
    • 1
  • Carmela Pipia
    • 1
  • Antonia Taglialavori
    • 1
  • Paola Di Fiore
    • 1
  • Rosolino Camarda
    • 1
  • Roberto Monastero
    • 1
  1. 1.Adult Headache Centre Department of Clinical NeuroscienceUniversity of PalermoPalermoItaly

Personalised recommendations