Visual Geosciences

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 49–57 | Cite as

Interactive visualization of 3D mantle convection

  • Megan Damon
  • Masanori C. Kameyama
  • Michael Knox
  • David H. Porter
  • Dave Yuen
  • Erik O. D. Sevre
Original Article

Abstract

The current availability of thousands of processors at many high performance computing centers has made it feasible to carry out, in near real time, interactive visualization of 3D mantle convection temperature fields, using grid configurations having 10–100 million unknowns. We will describe the technical details involved in carrying out this endeavor, using the facilities available at the Laboratory of Computational Science and Engineering (LCSE) at the University of Minnesota. These technical details involve the modification of a parallel mantle convection program, ACuTEMan; the usage of client–server socket based programs to transfer upwards of a terabyte of time series scientific model data using a local network; a rendering system containing multiple nodes; a high resolution PowerWall display, and the interactive visualization software, DSCVR. We have found that working in an interactive visualizastion mode allows for fast and efficient analysis of mantle convection results.

Keywords

3D volume visualization Mantle convection Interactive visualization Parallel computing 

Supplementary material

References

  1. Brandt A (1977) Multi-level adaptive solutions to boundary-value problems. Math Comput 31:333–390CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Chin-Purcell K (1993) Brick of bytes. Minnesota Supercomputing Center, Inc.Google Scholar
  3. Chorin AJ (1997) A numerical method for solving incompressible viscous flow problems. J Comp Phys 2:12–26CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cohen RE (2005) High-performance computing requirements for the computational solid earth sciences. http://www.geo-prose.com/computational_SES.html
  5. Kameyama M (2005) ACuTEMan: a multigrid-based mantle convection simulation code and its optimization to the Earth Simulator. J Earth Simul 4:2–10Google Scholar
  6. Kameyama M, Kageyama A, Sato T (2005) Multigrid iterative algorithm using pseudo-compressibility for three-dimensional mantle convection with strongly variable viscosity. J Comput Phys 206(1):162–181CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Margetts L, Smethurst C, Ford R (2005) Interactive finite element analysis, NAFEMS World CongressGoogle Scholar
  8. McKenzie DP, Roberts J, Weiss NO (1973) Convection in the Earth’s mantle. Tectonophysics 19:89–103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Quenette S, Moresi L, Sunter PD, Appelbe BF (2007) Explaining StGermain: an aspect oriented environment for building extensible computational mechanics modeling software. 21st IEEE international parallel and distributed processing symposiumGoogle Scholar
  10. Stacey FD (1992) Physics of the Earth. Brookfield Press, Brisbane, p 513Google Scholar
  11. Torrance KE, Turcotte DL (1971) Thermal convection with large viscosity variations. J Fluid Mech 47:113–125CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Trottenberg U, Oosterlee C, Schuller A (2001) Multigrid. Academic, New York, p 631Google Scholar
  13. Turcotte DL, Schubert G (1982) Geodynamics: applications of continuum physics to geological problems. Wiley, New York, p 450Google Scholar
  14. Wesseling P (1992) An introduction to Multigrid methods. Wiley, New York, p 284Google Scholar
  15. Woodward PR, Porter DH, Greensky J, Larson AJ, Knox M, Hanson J, Ravindran N, Fuchs T (2007) Interactive volume visualization of fluid flow simulation data. http://www.lcse.umn.edu/mri/PARA06-vis-paper-1-20-07-w-citation.pdf
  16. Zhou S, Oloso A, Damon M, Clune T (2006) Controlled parallel asynchronous IO, poster. In: Proceedings of SC2006. ACM/IEEE SupercomputingGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Megan Damon
    • 1
  • Masanori C. Kameyama
    • 2
  • Michael Knox
    • 3
  • David H. Porter
    • 3
  • Dave Yuen
    • 1
  • Erik O. D. Sevre
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geology and Geophysics and Minnesota Supercomputing InstituteUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Geodynamics CenterEhime UniversityEhimeJapan
  3. 3.Laboratory of Computational Sciences and EngineeringUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

Personalised recommendations