Colonization of Listeria monocytogenes in potting soils as affected by bacterial community composition, storage temperature, and natural amendment

Abstract

This study aimed to characterize the bacterial community of commercial potting soils with or without Listeria monocytogenes inoculation at 5–35 °C using 16S metagenomic sequencing and evaluate the effect of natural amendments on the reduction L. monocytogenes in non-sterile potting soils. An increase in the expected operational taxonomic units of each sample with or without L. monocytogenes was proportional to the increasing storage temperatures after 5 days. Biodiversity was distinct among all potting soils for Shannon and inverse Simpson indices, with the highest diversity being observed in a soil sample stored at 35 °C for 5 days with L. monocytogenes. An increase in richness and diversity of soil bacterial community structure positively correlated with less survival of the invading L. monocytogenes. Particularly, garlic extract was demonstrated as a promising soil-amendment substrate, reducing L. monocytogenes by ≥ 4.50 log CFU/g in potting soils stored at 35 °C.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Cooperative Research Program for Agricultural Science and Technology Development (Project numbers 01357801) and the National Institution of Agricultural Science, Rural Development Administration, the Republic of Korea. We also thank the general manager Mr. Gun-Tae Kim in the Personal Genome Business Division of the Macrogen Inc. (Seoul-si, Republic of Korea) for technical assistance and service.

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Yoon, JH., Kim, SA., Shim, WB. et al. Colonization of Listeria monocytogenes in potting soils as affected by bacterial community composition, storage temperature, and natural amendment. Food Sci Biotechnol 30, 869–880 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-021-00925-9

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Keywords

  • Bacterial community
  • Garlic extract amendment
  • Listeria monocytogenes
  • Potting soil
  • Soil chemical properties