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Physicochemical and sensory properties of protein-fortified cookies according to the ratio of isolated soy protein to whey protein

Abstract

A high-protein diet has a variety of beneficial effects and mixing isolated soybean protein (ISP) with whey protein (WP) reported to increases health and functional advantages. The objective of this study was to determine an adequate ratio for mixing these two proteins by evaluating the physical and sensory properties of protein-fortified samples. Samples with 5 different ratios of ISP to WP ranging from 100:0 to 0:100 were prepared. Proximate composition, density, spread factor, hardness and color values of five samples were measured and consumer acceptance test were conducted by 117 panelists to evaluate physicochemical and sensory properties of protein-fortified cookies. In a consumer acceptance test, the combination of ISP and WP increased consumer acceptance, and the highest overall acceptance was obtained when ISP and WP were used in a one to one ratio. As the ISP content increased, the density was higher, and the spreadability was the lowest. On the other hand, as WP increased, hardness increased significantly, and L*, a* and b* values increased (p < 0.05).The result of this study may facilitate the development of protein-enriched foods, which have various health benefits.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Korea Institute of Planning and Evaluation for Technology in Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (iPET), and is part of high value-added food development project [Grant Nr 2-2016-1903-001-2].

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HRP and JEO conducted to determine protein source ratios, made the Protein-Fortified Cookies, performed the statistical analysis, and wrote the first draft. GHK and YN collected data and revise a manuscript. MSC designed the study, provided the funding, supervised the project.

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Correspondence to Mi-Sook Cho.

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Park, HR., Kim, GH., Na, Y. et al. Physicochemical and sensory properties of protein-fortified cookies according to the ratio of isolated soy protein to whey protein. Food Sci Biotechnol 30, 653–661 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-021-00909-9

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Keywords

  • Protein fortification
  • Cookie
  • Isolated soybean protein
  • Whey protein
  • Physicochemical
  • Consumer acceptability