Brewing of glucuronic acid-enriched apple cider with enhanced antioxidant activities through the co-fermentation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia kudriavzevii) and bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum)

Abstract

Co-fermentation using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia kudriavzevii) and the bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum) as starters isolated from spontaneous sourdough was conducted for the brewing of glucuronic acid (GlcA)-enriched apple cider. The concentration of GlcA in the apple cider co-fermented for 14 d with commercial S. cerevisiae and L. plantarum was 37.7 ± 1.7 mg/mL while a concentration of 62.8 ± 3.1 mg/mL was recorded for fermentation with P. kudriavzevii and L. plantarum, which was higher than the corresponding single yeast fermentation. The co-fermented apple cider revealed higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of 171.67 ± 0.79 µg trolox equivalents (TE)/mL using P. kudriavzevii and L. plantarum, compared to the control (143.89 ± 7.07 µg TE/mL) just using S. cerevisiae. Thus, the co-fermentation of S. cerevisiae and L. plantarum and P. kudriavzevii and L. plantarum provided a new strategy for the development of GlcA-enriched apple cider with enhanced antioxidant capacity.

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Acknowledgements

The study was financially supported by the Shandong Provincial Government-University Joint Training Program (2019-27-f2-87) for visiting scholars, the Advanced Talents Foundation of Qingdao Agricultural University (663-1118006), and was partially supported by a grant from National Research Foundation of Korea (2018R1D1A1B07049569, TTH Nguyen, 2018R1D1A1A09083366, D Kim, NRF-2018R1C1B6006348, I Mok). This research was also partially supported by the Nuclear R&D program of Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT), Republic of Korea, and by the Korean Institute of Planning and Evaluation for Technology in Food, Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries (IPET) through the Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Convergence Technologies Program for Educating Creative Global Leader, funded by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (MAFRA) (D. Kim, 710012-03-1-HD220), and by the OTTOGI Corporation through the Research and Publication Project.

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Correspondence to Doman Kim.

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Li, Y., Nguyen, T.T.H., Jin, J. et al. Brewing of glucuronic acid-enriched apple cider with enhanced antioxidant activities through the co-fermentation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia kudriavzevii) and bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum). Food Sci Biotechnol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-021-00883-2

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Keywords

  • Glucuronic acid
  • Co-fermentation
  • Lactobacillus plantarum
  • Antioxidant activity
  • Apple cider