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In vivo antioxidant potentials of rambutan, mangosteen, and langsat peel extracts and effects on liver enzymes in experimental rats

Abstract

Antioxidative potentials of peel extracts of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum), mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana), and langsat (Lansium domesticum) in experimental rats were investigated. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using liver enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems. Rats were treated with fruit peel extracts for 14 and 30 days. Blood was collected on the final day of treatment and the liver was harvested for antioxidant assays. A significant decrease (p<0.05) in blood enzyme marker levels, compared with a control group, were observed. Oral administration of peel extracts for 14 and 30 days resulted in a significant increase (p<0.05) in superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation levels, compared with a control group. Rambutan peel extracts exhibited a higher antioxidant potency than mangosteen and langsat. These fruit peels can be developed into functional foods with antioxidative properties.

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Correspondence to Hip Seng Yim.

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Samuagam, L., Sia, C.M., Akowuah, G.A. et al. In vivo antioxidant potentials of rambutan, mangosteen, and langsat peel extracts and effects on liver enzymes in experimental rats. Food Sci Biotechnol 24, 191–198 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-015-0026-y

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Keywords

  • antioxidative potential
  • Lansium domesticum
  • Garcinia mangostana
  • Nephelium lappaceum