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Optimum conditions for S-allyl-(L)-cysteine accumulation in aged garlic by RSM

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the optimum conditions for accumulating SAC [S-allyl-(L)- cysteine]. Although SAC is one of the bioactive compounds in garlic that has been reported to be beneficial for good health, it is found only in trace amounts in raw garlic bulbs and there are no clear research results indicating the accumulation method. We discovered a new method for accumulating SAC by adding a freezing and thawing process. Furthermore the aging process was undertaken at a lower temperature to reduce energy consumption. A 1.64-fold increase in the SAC content of thawed garlic surveyed was noted compared to fresh garlic (2.6391±0.0022 mg/dry g vs. 1.7363±0.2180 mg/dry g). Maximum accumulation (8.0212 mg/dry g) was achieved after 15 days of aging at 40°C, and response surface analysis was performed to determine the optimum conditions including aging period and temperature.

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Correspondence to Sang Ha Noh.

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Park, S.H., Lee, H., Kim, H.S. et al. Optimum conditions for S-allyl-(L)-cysteine accumulation in aged garlic by RSM. Food Sci Biotechnol 23, 717–722 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-014-0097-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-014-0097-1

Keywords

  • garlic
  • thawing process
  • S-allyl-(L)-cysteine
  • RSM
  • greening