Mycophenolate mofetil and deflazacort combination in neuropsychiatric lupus: a decade of experience from a tertiary care teaching hospital in southern India

  • Nikhil Gupta
  • Arvind Ganpati
  • Santosh Mandal
  • John Mathew
  • Ruchika Goel
  • Ashish Jacob Mathew
  • Aswin Nair
  • Prakash Ramasamy
  • Debashish Danda
Original Article
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Abstract

Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an effective therapeutic agent with high safety profile in the management of lupus nephritis. This retrospective study was conducted to assess the efficacy and side effect profile of MMF as induction as well as maintenance therapeutic agent along with tapering steroids in neuropsychiatric lupus (NPSLE). Hospital electronic medical records of patients with SLE diagnosed by ACR 1990 and/or SLICC 2012 criteria between January 2005 and May 2015 were retrieved. Among them, patients fulfilling ACR 1999 criteria for NPSLE were identified. Data of NPSLE patients treated with MMF as upfront second line immunosuppressive agent, both for induction and maintenance, were analyzed. Of the 140 patients with NPSLE, 88 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean age of the cohort was 25.51 ± 7.82 years with female to male ratio of 84:4. Median duration of follow-up was 33 months (3–129 months). Seizure was the most common NPSLE manifestation (n = 37, 42.05%). Of the 88 patients, 18 had NPSLE solely due to secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. Of the remaining 70 patients, 61 (87.1%) had improved, 7 remained unchanged with no worsening and 3 patients had worsening or developed new symptoms during follow up after 3 months from baseline. At last follow-up, 55 out of 57 patients (97.1%) with detailed data had improved, while 2 patients had relapsed. Side effects were significantly more common in patients on prednisolone as compared to those on deflazacort. In patients with NPSLE, MMF along with tapering steroids is an efficacious combo in inducing remission and preventing relapse of disease.

Keywords

CNS lupus Deflazacort MMF Mycophenolate mofetil Neuropsychiatric lupus Prednisolone 

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Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nikhil Gupta
    • 1
  • Arvind Ganpati
    • 1
  • Santosh Mandal
    • 1
  • John Mathew
    • 1
  • Ruchika Goel
    • 1
  • Ashish Jacob Mathew
    • 1
  • Aswin Nair
    • 1
  • Prakash Ramasamy
    • 2
  • Debashish Danda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Immunology and RheumatologyChristian Medical College & HospitalVelloreIndia
  2. 2.Department of BiostatisticsChristian Medical College and HospitalVelloreIndia

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