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Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 1083–1089 | Cite as

Knee symptoms among adults at risk for accelerated knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

  • Julie Davis
  • Charles B. Eaton
  • Grace H. Lo
  • Bing Lu
  • Lori Lyn Price
  • Timothy E. McAlindon
  • Mary F. Barbe
  • Jeffrey B. DribanEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine if adults who develop accelerated knee osteoarthritis (KOA) have greater knee symptoms with certain activities than those with or without incident common KOA. We conducted a case-control study using data from baseline and the first four annual visits of the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Participants had no radiographic KOA at baseline (Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) <2). We classified 3 groups as follows: (1) accelerated KOA: > = 1 knee developed advance-stage KOA (KL = 3 or 4) within 48 months, (2) common KOA: > = 1 knee increased in radiographic severity (excluding those with accelerated KOA), and (3) no KOA: no change in radiographic severity by 48 months. We focused on individual items from the WOMAC pain/function subscales and KOOS pain/symptoms subscales. The index visit was a year before a person met the definition for accelerated, common, or no KOA. To examine group difference in knee symptoms, we used ordinal logistic regression models for each symptom. Results are reported as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Individuals who developed accelerated KOA were more likely to report greater difficulty with lying down (OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 4.25), pain with straightening the knee fully (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.08, 3.85), and pain walking (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.38, 4.84) than adults who developed common KOA. Individuals who develop accelerated KOA report greater symptoms with certain activities than those with common KOA. Our results may help identify individuals at risk for accelerated KOA or with early-stage accelerated KOA.

Keywords

Methodology OA Observational studies Pain Rheumatic diseases Specialty fields 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

The OAI has been approved and meets all criteria for ethical standards regarding human and animal studies defined in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and all amendments made after. Institutional review boards at each OAI clinical site and the OAI coordinating center (University of California, San Francisco) approved the OAI study. All participants provided informed consent prior to participation.

Grant support

These analyses were financially supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01 AR065977. The OAI is a public-private partnership comprised of five contracts (N01-AR-2-2258; N01-AR-2-2259; N01-AR-2-2260; N01-AR-2-2261; N01-AR-2-2262) funded by the National Institutes of Health, a branch of the Department of Health and Human Services, and conducted by the OAI Study Investigators. Private funding partners include Merck Research Laboratories, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, GlaxoSmithKline, and Pfizer, Inc. Private sector funding for the OAI is managed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. This manuscript was prepared using an OAI public use data set and does not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the OAI investigators, the NIH, or the private funding partners. This work was also supported in part by the Houston Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence (HFP90-020). The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Davis
    • 1
  • Charles B. Eaton
    • 2
  • Grace H. Lo
    • 3
    • 4
  • Bing Lu
    • 5
  • Lori Lyn Price
    • 6
    • 7
  • Timothy E. McAlindon
    • 1
  • Mary F. Barbe
    • 8
  • Jeffrey B. Driban
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of RheumatologyTufts Medical CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Center for Primary Care and PreventionAlpert Medical School of Brown UniversityPawtucketUSA
  3. 3.Medical Care Line and Research Care Line, Houston Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center of Excellence Michael E. DeBakey VAMCHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Section of Immunology, Allergy, and RheumatologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  5. 5.Division of Rheumatology, Immunology & Allergy, Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  6. 6.The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy StudiesTufts Medical CenterBostonUSA
  7. 7.Tufts Clinical and Translational Science InstituteTufts UniversityBostonUSA
  8. 8.Department of Anatomy and Cell BiologyTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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