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A framework for constructing and evaluating the role of MR as a holographic virtual guide in museums

Abstract

Mixed reality (MR) is a cutting-edge technology at the forefront of many new applications in the tourism and cultural heritage sector. This study aims to reshape the museum experience by creating a highly engaging and immersive museum experience for visitors combing real-time visual, audio information and computer-generated images with museum artefacts and customer displays. This research introduces a theoretical framework that assesses the potential of MR guidance system in usefulness, ease of use, enjoyment, interactivity, touring and future applications. The evaluation introduces the MuseumEye MR application in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo using mixed method surveys and a sample of 171 participants. The results of the questionnaire highlighted the importance of the mediating the role of the tour guide in enhancing the relationship between perceived usefulness, ease of use, multimedia, UI design, interactivity and the intention of use. Furthermore, the results of this study revealed the potential future use of MR in museums and ensured sustainability and engagement past the traditional visitor museum experience, which heightens the economic state of museums and cultural heritage sectors.

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Acknowledgements

This study was constructed from a PhD thesis by the 1st author. We would like to thank the Egyptian museum in Cairo curators for their help and support. Also, we want to thank The Egyptian government for facilitating the experiment and getting all approvals requested.

Funding

This project was funded by Newton-Mosharafa scholarship which was managed by the British council in Egypt.

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Contributions

This paper is constructed from my PhD thesis under title “Virtual Guidance using Mixed Reality in Historical Places and Museums” in 2019. The co-authors contributed as follows. MM is the PhD supervisor who actively contributed text and critical analysis of the work presented in this article. ZA-K is an expert in statistical analysis and he contributed by reviewing the PROCESS statistical method to demonstrate the quantitative results in a better form. CS is a computer programmer and he helped in the technical programing issues in the Mixed Reality system; in addition, he enhanced the clarity of discussion section of the article.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ramy Hammady.

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The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

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This manuscript has not been published and is not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

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The project was granted an ethics approval from Staffordshire university through an ethics committee as part of my PhD project in 2018. The ethics approval included revealing human figures who participated voluntarily in the study and signed the consent forms.

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Hammady, R., Ma, M., AL-Kalha, Z. et al. A framework for constructing and evaluating the role of MR as a holographic virtual guide in museums. Virtual Reality 25, 895–918 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10055-020-00497-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10055-020-00497-9

Keywords

  • Mixed reality
  • Virtual guide
  • Museums
  • Holographic system
  • Microsoft HoloLens