Journal of Human Genetics

, Volume 52, Issue 7, pp 592–598

Allelic variation in the NPY gene in 14 Indian populations

  • L. V. K. S. Bhaskar
  • K. Thangaraj
  • Anish M. Shah
  • G. Pardhasaradhi
  • K. Praveen Kumar
  • A. G. Reddy
  • A. Papa Rao
  • C. J. Mulligan
  • Lalji Singh
  • V. R. Rao
Original Article

Abstract

NPY is a 36-aminoacid peptide expressed in several areas of the nervous system. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors represent a widely diffused system that is involved in the regulation of multiple biological functions. The human NPY gene is located in chromosome 7. The functional significance of coding Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide of preproNPY is known. Six hundred and fifty four individuals of 14 ethnic Indian populations were screened for three mutations in the NPY gene, including Leu7Pro. We found that the Pro7 frequencies among the studied populations were much higher than in previous studies from other parts of the world. The highest allele frequency of Pro7 was detected in the Kota population in the Nilgiri Hill region of south India, and this may reflect a founder event in the past or genetic drift. All populations followed the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium for the assayed markers. A total of five haplotypes were observed, only two of which were found to occur with a high frequency in all populations. No linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed across the tested alleles in any population with the exception of Leu7Pro and Ser50Ser in the Badaga population (χ2 = 13.969; p = 0.0001).

Keywords

Neuropeptide Y SNP Allelic variation 

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Copyright information

© The Japan Society of Human Genetics and Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. V. K. S. Bhaskar
    • 1
  • K. Thangaraj
    • 1
  • Anish M. Shah
    • 1
  • G. Pardhasaradhi
    • 1
  • K. Praveen Kumar
    • 1
  • A. G. Reddy
    • 1
  • A. Papa Rao
    • 2
  • C. J. Mulligan
    • 3
  • Lalji Singh
    • 1
  • V. R. Rao
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Cellular and Molecular BiologyHyderabadIndia
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologySri Venkateswara UniversityTirupatiIndia
  3. 3.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of FloridaFloridaUSA
  4. 4.Anthropological Survey of IndiaKolkataIndia

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