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Day-case inguinal hernia repair in the elderly: a surgical priority

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Abstract

Purpose

To compare patients over 70 years old with those under 50 years old undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

Patients and methods

Fifty patients aged >70 years (group A) and 50 patients age <50 years (group B) underwent local anaesthetic mesh repair. The mean age for group A was 77.2 years (range 70–85) and for group B it was 40.2 years (range 17–49). There were 46 patients with comorbidities in group A and seven in group B. There were 30 patients with cardiac comorbidities in group A and two in group B.

Results

There were no major complications, infections, haematomas or unplanned admissions in either group. Patients >70 years of age had less post-operative discomfort and recovered more quickly than patients aged <50 years. The number of days of analgesic use and time to return to normal activities was longer in the younger group, 6.0 versus 3.4 and 21 versus 13, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups in patients having discomfort at 3 months post-operatively. More patients were satisfied in the older group, though the difference was not statistically significant.

Conclusion

Elective inguinal hernia repair under local anaesthetic in the elderly has a good outcome, even if there are significant comorbidities. Ambulatory surgery is feasible in this age group and age alone or co-existing disease should not be a barrier to elective day-case inguinal hernia repair.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Mr. Andrew Westlake MA, MSc for his statistical advice.

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Correspondence to M. Kurzer.

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Kurzer, M., Kark, A. & Hussain, S.T. Day-case inguinal hernia repair in the elderly: a surgical priority. Hernia 13, 131–136 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-008-0452-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-008-0452-3

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