Ecosystems

, Volume 19, Issue 6, pp 1133–1147

When a Tree Dies in the Forest: Scaling Climate-Driven Tree Mortality to Ecosystem Water and Carbon Fluxes

  • William R. L. Anderegg
  • Jordi Martinez-Vilalta
  • Maxime Cailleret
  • Jesus Julio Camarero
  • Brent E. Ewers
  • David Galbraith
  • Arthur Gessler
  • Rüdiger Grote
  • Cho-ying Huang
  • Shaun R. Levick
  • Thomas L. Powell
  • Lucy Rowland
  • Raúl Sánchez-Salguero
  • Volodymyr Trotsiuk
Article

Abstract

Drought- and heat-driven tree mortality, along with associated insect outbreaks, have been observed globally in recent decades and are expected to increase in future climates. Despite its potential to profoundly alter ecosystem carbon and water cycles, how tree mortality scales up to ecosystem functions and fluxes is uncertain. We describe a framework for this scaling where the effects of mortality are a function of the mortality attributes, such as spatial clustering and functional role of the trees killed, and ecosystem properties, such as productivity and diversity. We draw upon remote-sensing data and ecosystem flux data to illustrate this framework and place climate-driven tree mortality in the context of other major disturbances. We find that emerging evidence suggests that climate-driven tree mortality impacts may be relatively small and recovery times are remarkably fast (~4 years for net ecosystem production). We review the key processes in ecosystem models necessary to simulate the effects of mortality on ecosystem fluxes and highlight key research gaps in modeling. Overall, our results highlight the key axes of variation needed for better monitoring and modeling of the impacts of tree mortality and provide a foundation for including climate-driven tree mortality in a disturbance framework.

Keywords

disturbance recovery resilience productivity biodiversity carbon and water fluxes 

Supplementary material

10021_2016_9982_MOESM1_ESM.docx (41 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 40 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • William R. L. Anderegg
    • 1
  • Jordi Martinez-Vilalta
    • 2
    • 3
  • Maxime Cailleret
    • 4
  • Jesus Julio Camarero
    • 5
  • Brent E. Ewers
    • 6
  • David Galbraith
    • 7
  • Arthur Gessler
    • 8
    • 9
  • Rüdiger Grote
    • 10
  • Cho-ying Huang
    • 11
  • Shaun R. Levick
    • 12
  • Thomas L. Powell
    • 13
  • Lucy Rowland
    • 14
  • Raúl Sánchez-Salguero
    • 15
  • Volodymyr Trotsiuk
    • 16
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.CREAFCerdanyola del VallèsSpain
  3. 3.Univ. Autònoma BarcelonaCerdanyola del VallèsSpain
  4. 4.Department of Environmental Systems SciencesETH ZürichZurichSwitzerland
  5. 5.Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología (IPE-CSIC)ZaragozaSpain
  6. 6.Department of Botany and Program in EcologyUniversity of WyomingLaramieUSA
  7. 7.School of GeographyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK
  8. 8.Research Unit Forest DynamicsSwiss Federal Research Institute WSLBirmensdorfSwitzerland
  9. 9.Berlin-Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research (BBIB)BerlinGermany
  10. 10.Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK-IFU)Karlsruhe Institute of TechnologyGarmisch-PartenkirchenGermany
  11. 11.Department of GeographyNational Taiwan UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  12. 12.Max Planck Institute for BiogeochemistryJenaGermany
  13. 13.Department of Organismic and Evolutionary BiologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  14. 14.School of GeosciencesUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  15. 15.Dpto. Sistemas Físicos, Químicos y NaturalesUniversidad Pablo de OlavideSevilleSpain
  16. 16.Faculty of Forestry and Wood SciencesCzech University of Life Sciences PraguePragueCzech Republic

Personalised recommendations