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Unexplored Brazilian oceanic island host high salt tolerant biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains

Abstract

We aimed to isolate biosurfactant-producing bacteria in high salt conditions from uncontaminated soils on the Brazilian oceanic island, Trindade. Blood agar medium was used for the isolation of presumptive biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Confirmation and measurements of biosurfactant production were made using an oil-spreading method. The isolates were identified by fatty acid profiles and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. A total of 14 isolates obtained from the 12 soil samples were found to produce biosurfactants. Among them, two isolates stood out as being able to produce biosurfactant that is increasingly active in solutions containing up to 175 g L−1 NaCl. These high salt tolerant biosurfactant producers are affiliated to different species of the genus Bacillus. Soil organic matter showed positive correlation with the number of biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from our different sampling sites. The applied approach successfully recovered and identified biosurfactant-producing bacteria from non-contaminated soils. Due to the elevated salt tolerance, as well as their capacity to produce biosurfactants, these isolates are promising for environmental biotechnological applications, especially in the oil production chain.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the Brazilian Navy and Captain Rodrigo Otoch Chaves for the logistic support while collecting samples, and providing the essential structure to sample transportation and storage, and Dr. Marc Redmile-Gordon (Centre for Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems, Rothamsted Research, UK) for critical comments and review of the written English in the manuscript. CNPq grant 405544/2012-0 (PROTRINDADE), FAPEMIG and CAPES (PROEX) funded this work. This work is also supported by the Brazilian Microbiome Project (http://brmicrobiome.org).

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Correspondence to Victor Satler Pylro.

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Communicated by M. da Costa.

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da Silva, F.S.P., Pylro, V.S., Fernandes, P.L. et al. Unexplored Brazilian oceanic island host high salt tolerant biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains. Extremophiles 19, 561–572 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00792-015-0740-7

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Keywords

  • Trindade Island
  • Oceanic Islands
  • Biosurfactants
  • Bacillus