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Extremophiles

, Volume 14, Issue 6, pp 493–499 | Cite as

Halorussus rarus gen. nov., sp. nov., a new member of the family Halobacteriaceae isolated from a marine solar saltern

  • Heng-Lin Cui
  • Xia Gao
  • Xin Yang
  • Xue-Wei Xu
Original Paper

Abstract

Two halophilic archaeal strains TBN4T and TBN5 were isolated from Taibei marine solar saltern in Jiangsu, China. Both strains showed light red-pigmented colonies and their cells were rod, motile and Gram-stain-negative. They were able to grow at 25–50°C (optimum 37°C), at 1.4–4.3 M NaCl (optimum 2.1 M NaCl), at 0–1.0 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.005 M MgCl2) and at pH 6.0–9.0 (optimum pH 7.0). Their cells lyse in distilled water and minimal NaCl concentration to prevent cell lysis is 8% (w/v). The major polar lipids of the two strains were PG (phosphatidylglycerol), PGP-Me (phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester), PGS (phosphatidylglycerol sulfate) and five glycolipids chromatographically identical to S-TGD-1 (sulfated galactosyl mannosyl glucosyl diether), S-DGD-1 (sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether), TGD-1 (galactosyl mannosyl glucosyl diether), DGD-1 (mannosyl glucosyl diether) and DGD-2 (an unknown diglycosyl diether). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TBN4T and strain TBN5 formed a distinct clade with genus Haladaptatus (showing 90.0–90.9% 16S rRNA gene similarities). The DNA G + C content of strain TBN4T and strain TBN5 are 66.1 and 65.4 mol%, respectively. The DNA–DNA hybridization value between strain TBN4T and strain TBN5 was 94.3%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strain TBN4T and strain TBN5 represent a novel species in a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halorussus rarus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TBN4T (=CGMCC 1.10122T = JCM 16429T).

Keywords

Halorussus rarus gen. nov., sp. nov. Halophilic archaeon Marine solar saltern 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 30970006) and the opening project of State key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. SKLMR-20100604).

Supplementary material

792_2010_329_MOESM1_ESM.doc (104 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 103 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Food and Biological EngineeringJiangsu UniversityZhenjiangPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of MicrobiologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Second Institute of OceanographyState Oceanic AdministrationHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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