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European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

, Volume 28, Issue 10, pp 1411–1413 | Cite as

Reply to critical comments on the article ‘Increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders in children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receiving sensory integration therapy: a population-based cohort study’

  • Ruu-Fen Tzang
  • Kai-Liang Kao
  • Chih-Hsin Muo
  • Shu-I WuEmail author
  • Fung-Chang Sung
  • Robert Stewart
Letter to the Editor
  • 180 Downloads

Lai et al. present comments on our article, entitled “Increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders in children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receiving sensory integration therapy: a population-based cohort study” [1]. They propose that our study failed to address the effectiveness of sensory integration (SI) therapy for children with ADHD. They challenge our study design, although they fail to indicate that SI therapy is not currently in the clinical practice guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics for the treatment of ADHD. To date, there is still no clear indication of how often or with what dosage a child with ADHD should receive SI therapy to demonstrate the treatment effectiveness.

Methylphenidate (MPH) therapy and psychosocial interventions are the management approaches adopted by clinical practice guidelines to improve ADHD symptoms, such as inattention, hyperactivity, or impulsivity [2, 3]. Although MPH therapy is not recommended for...

Notes

Acknowledgements

RS is part-funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Authors declare no financial or personal conflict of interest with a third party, whose interest would influence the article’s contents.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruu-Fen Tzang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kai-Liang Kao
    • 4
  • Chih-Hsin Muo
    • 5
    • 6
  • Shu-I Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Fung-Chang Sung
    • 5
    • 7
  • Robert Stewart
    • 8
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of MedicineMackay Medical CollegeNew Taipei CityTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryMackay Memorial HospitalTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.Mackay Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and ManagementTaipeiTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsFar Eastern Memorial HospitalTaipeiTaiwan
  5. 5.Management Office for Health DataChina Medical University HospitalTaichungTaiwan
  6. 6.College of MedicineChina Medical University HospitalTaichungTaiwan
  7. 7.Department of Health Services AdministrationChina Medical University College of Public HealthTaichungTaiwan
  8. 8.Department of Psychological MedicineKing’s College London (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience)LondonUK
  9. 9.South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation TrustLondonUK

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