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Occlusal veneer restoration treatment outcomes of cracked tooth syndrome: A 22.4-month follow-up study

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Abstract

Objectives

The aims of this clinical study were to investigate success rate, vital pulp survival rate, tooth survival rate and patient-reported masticatory ability by evaluating the pain symptoms and signs of the cracked teeth as well as Index of Eating Difficulty (IED) and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) questionnaire after cracked teeth were restored with occlusal veneers.

Materials and methods

27 cracked teeth of 24 patients with cold and/or biting pains without spontaneous/nocturnal pains were recruited in this study. The cracked teeth were restored with occlusal veneers fabricated by lithium disilicate ceramic. Cold test and biting test were used to evaluate pain signs. IED and OHIP-14 questionnaire were used to evaluate masticatory ability. FDI criteria was used to evaluate restorations. The paired Wilcoxon test was used to analyze significant differences of detection rate of pain signs, OHIP scores and IED grade before and after restorations. Kaplan–Meier survival curve was used to describe the success rate, vital pulp survival rate, and tooth survival rate.

Results

27 cracked teeth were restored with occlusal veneers with average of 22.4-month follow-up. Two cracked teeth had pulpitis and pain signs of the other cracked teeth completely disappeared. OHIP total scores were significantly reduced after treatment. Scores of ‘pain’, ‘occlusal discomfort’, ‘uncomfortable to eat’, ‘diet unsatisfactory’ and ‘interrupted meals’ reduced significantly after treatment. After treatment, IED grades of 25 vital teeth were significantly lower than those before treatment. FDI scores of 25 restorations except for 2 teeth with pulpitis were no greater than 2. The 12 months accumulated pulp survival rate of the cracked teeth was 92.6%. The 12 months accumulated tooth survival rate was 100%. The success rate at the latest recall was 92.6%.

Conclusion

Occlusal veneer restorations with success rate of 92.6% and the same pulp survival rate might be an effective restoration for treating the cracked teeth.

Clinical relevance

The occlusal veneer restorations might be an option for treating the cracked teeth when cracks only involve enamel and dentin, not dental pulp.

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Data availability

The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

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Acknowledgements

The author sincerely thanks all the specialists in the Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Laboratory, Stomatology Hospital, School of Stomatology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine in China.

Funding

Funding for the study was provided by the Research and Development Project of Stomatology Hospital Zhejiang University School of Medicine (Project ID: RD2022YYYB02). This study was sponsored by a research grant of Ivoclar Vivadent AG. The sponsor was not involved in the collection/interpretation of data, writing the report, or the decision to submit.

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Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

ZWJ: involved in the study design, collecting the data and writing the manuscript. LJ: involved in collecting the data. ZSS & ZZY: involved in literature review. SZW: involved in critical review. FBP: involved in conception, performing the treatment and critical review. JXT: involved in the study design, performing the treatment and critical review.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Baiping Fu or Xiaoting Jin.

Ethics declarations

Ethical approval and consent to participate

The patients signed an informing consent for prosthodontic treatment. The patients agreed and permitted the publication of the case report. The protocol was approved from the Department of Prosthodontics, the Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, School of Stomatology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine.

Conflict of interest

The authors deny any conflicts of interest related to this study.

Competing interest

The authors declare no competing interests.

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Zhao, W., Luo, J., Zhang, S. et al. Occlusal veneer restoration treatment outcomes of cracked tooth syndrome: A 22.4-month follow-up study. Clin Oral Invest 28, 368 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-024-05735-x

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