World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI: a systematic review of medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction: prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment

Abstract

Objectives

Medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction (MISGD) causes significant morbidity resulting in decreased quality of life. This systematic review assessed the literature on the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of MISGD.

Materials and methods

Electronic databases were searched for articles related to MISGD through June 2013. Four independent reviewers extracted information regarding study design, study population, interventions, outcomes, and conclusions for each article. Only papers with acceptable degree of relevance, quality of methodology, and strength of evidence were retained for further analysis.

Results

There were limited data on the epidemiology of MISGD. Furthermore, various methods were used to assess salivary flow rate or xerostomia. Preventive and therapeutic strategies included substitution of medications, oral, or systemic therapy with sialogogues, use of saliva substitutes or of electro-stimulating devices. Although there are promising approaches to improve salivary gland function, most studies are characterized by small numbers and heterogeneous methods.

Conclusions

Physicians and dentists should identify the medications associated with xerostomia and salivary gland dysfunction through a thorough medical history. Preferably, health care providers should measure the unstimulated and stimulated whole salivary flow rates of all their patients so that these values can be used as a baseline to rate the complaints of patients who subsequently claim to experience xerostomia or salivary gland dysfunction as well as the possibilities of effectively treating this condition.

Clinical relevance

MISGD remains a major burden for the population. This systematic review provides a contemporary in-depth description of the diagnosis and treatment of MISGD.

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Acknowledgments

Our sponsors, American Academy of Oral Medicine, Biocosmetics, patients of Dr. David Sirois, European Association of Oral Medicine, Johnson and Johnson, The Oral Cancer Foundation, Unilever, and Elsevier are gratefully acknowledged for their unrestricted educational grants to help us hold the 2014 World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI meeting in Orlando.

Compliance with ethical standards

The authors declare that in preparing this manuscript, they have complied with all relevant and known ethical standards.

Conflict of interest

Andy Wolff owns stock in Saliwell Ltd. The other authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Villa, A., Wolff, A., Aframian, D. et al. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI: a systematic review of medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction: prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment. Clin Oral Invest 19, 1563–1580 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-015-1488-2

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Keywords

  • Xerostomia
  • Saliva
  • Medications
  • Salivary gland dysfunction