Personal and Ubiquitous Computing

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 155–173

FIDO—Facilitating interactions for dogs with occupations: wearable communication interfaces for working dogs

  • Melody M. Jackson
  • Giancarlo Valentin
  • Larry Freil
  • Lily Burkeen
  • Clint Zeagler
  • Scott Gilliland
  • Barbara Currier
  • Thad Starner
Original Article

Abstract

Working dogs have improved the lives of thousands of people throughout history. However, communication between human and canine partners is currently limited. The main goal of the FIDO project is to research fundamental aspects of wearable technologies to support communication between working dogs and their handlers. In this study, the FIDO team investigated on-body interfaces for dogs in the form of wearable technology integrated into assistance dog vests. We created five different sensors that dogs could activate based on natural dog behaviors such as biting, tugging, and nose touches. We then tested the sensors on-body with eight dogs previously trained for a variety of occupations and compared their effectiveness in several dimensions. We were able to demonstrate that it is possible to create wearable sensors that dogs can reliably activate on command, and to determine cognitive and physical factors that affect dogs’ success with body–worn interaction technology.

Keywords

Wearable technology Animal–computer interaction Assistance dogs 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melody M. Jackson
    • 1
  • Giancarlo Valentin
    • 1
  • Larry Freil
    • 1
  • Lily Burkeen
    • 1
  • Clint Zeagler
    • 1
  • Scott Gilliland
    • 1
  • Barbara Currier
    • 2
  • Thad Starner
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.PO2 AgilityCummingUSA

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