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Personal and Ubiquitous Computing

, Volume 18, Issue 7, pp 1617–1629 | Cite as

From interaction to performance with public displays

  • Judy ChenEmail author
  • Paul Dourish
  • Gillian R. Hayes
  • Melissa Mazmanian
Original Article

Abstract

Interacting with public displays involves more than what happens between individuals and the system; it also concerns how people experience others around and through those displays. In this paper, we use “performance” as an analytical lens for understanding experiences with a public display called rhythIMs and explore how displays shift social interaction through their mediation. By performance, we refer to a situation in which people are on display and orient themselves toward an audience that may be co-located, imagined, or virtual. To understand interaction with public displays, we use two related notions of collectives—audiences and groups—to highlight the ways in which people orient to each other through public displays. Drawing examples from rhythIMs, a public display that shows patterns of instant messaging and physical presence, we demonstrate that there can be multiple, heterogeneous audiences and show how people experience these different types of collectives in various ways. By taking a performance perspective, we are able to understand how audiences that were not physically co-present with participants still influenced participants’ interpretations and interactions with rhythIMs. This extension of the traditional notion of audience illuminates the roles audiences can play in a performance.

Keywords

Public displays Performance Groups Audiences 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the GAANN Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Education, the ARCS Foundation, the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, and the National Science Foundation under award 0712890. We are grateful to the study participants and our colleagues at UCI for their feedback.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judy Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Paul Dourish
    • 1
  • Gillian R. Hayes
    • 1
  • Melissa Mazmanian
    • 1
  1. 1.Donald Bren School of Information and Computer SciencesUniversity of California, IrvineIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Google Inc.Mountain ViewUSA

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