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Correlations between patient satisfaction and ability to perform daily activities after total knee arthroplasty: why aren’t patients satisfied?

  • Original Article
  • Published:
Journal of Orthopaedic Science

Abstract

Background

Patient satisfaction has become an important parameter for assessing overall outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The level of difficulty in performing activities of daily life that affects overall patient satisfaction is unknown. We therefore evaluated the influence of difficulty in performing activities of daily life on patient satisfaction and expectations.

Methods

The 2011 Knee Society Knee Scoring System Questionnaire was mailed to patients who had undergone TKA with 375 patients completing and returning it. We evaluated the relationship between the ability to perform daily activities, as assessed via the questionnaire, and patient satisfaction and expectations of the same score in each patient using linear regression analysis. We also determined which activities affected patient satisfaction and expectations using multivariate linear regression analyses.

Results

All patient-derived functional activities correlated significantly with the patient satisfaction score. In particular, “climbing up or down a flight of stairs” followed by “getting into or out of a car,” “moving laterally (stepping to the side)” and “walking and standing” correlated strongly with patient satisfaction by linear regression analysis and were revealed to have significant contributions to patient satisfaction by multivariate linear regression analysis. Regarding expectations, all patient-derived functional activities correlated significantly with the patient expectation score, although none of the correlation coefficients was very high. “Squatting,” followed by “walking and standing,” contributed to the patient expectation score by multivariate linear regression analysis.

Conclusion

Activities related to walking and standing are some of the most basic movements and basic demands for patients. In addition, “climbing up or down a flight of stairs,” “getting into and out of a car” and “squatting” are very important and distressing activities that significantly correlate with patient satisfaction after TKA.

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Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research (Grant Number 23000011) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ken Okazaki.

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Nakahara, H., Okazaki, K., Mizu-uchi, H. et al. Correlations between patient satisfaction and ability to perform daily activities after total knee arthroplasty: why aren’t patients satisfied?. J Orthop Sci 20, 87–92 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00776-014-0671-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00776-014-0671-7

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