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Osteoporosis increases the risk of rotator cuff tears: a population-based cohort study

Abstract

Introduction

Osteoporosis has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for rotator cuff retears after surgery; however, no studies have directly investigated the association between osteoporosis and the development of rotator cuff tears. To investigate whether osteoporosis is associated with an increased risk of rotator cuff tears.

Materials and methods

We conducted a population-based, matched-cohort study with a 7-year follow-uTwo matched cohorts (n = 3511 with osteoporosis and 17,555 without osteoporosis) were recruited from Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Dataset. Person-year data and incidence rates were evaluated. A multivariable Cox model was used to derive an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) after controlling for age, sex, and various prespecified comorbidities. Age and sex were added in the model to test for interaction with osteoporosis.

Results

Women constituted 88.5% of the cohorts. During follow-up of 17,067 and 100,501 person-years for the osteoporosis and nonosteoporosis cohorts, 166 and 89 rotator cuff tears occurred, respectively. The cumulative incidence of rotator cuff tears was significantly higher in the osteoporosis cohort than in the nonosteoporosis cohort (p < 0.001, log-rank). The Cox model revealed a 1.79-fold increase in rotator cuff tears in the osteoporosis cohort, with an aHR of 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.55–2.05). Effect modification of sex and age on rotator cuff tears was not found in patients with osteoporosis.

Conclusion

This population-based study supports the hypothesis that compared with individuals without osteoporosis, those with osteoporosis have a higher risk of developing rotator cuff tears.

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Acknowledgements

This manuscript was edited by Wallace Academic Editing.Page: 20.

Funding

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Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

JPH and CHL conceived of the presented idea. HWL developed the theory and performed the computations. SWH verified the analytical methods. JPH wrote the manuscript with support from CHL and PC. HCC helped supervise the project. All authors discussed the results and contributed to the final manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Hui-Wen Lin.

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Conflict of interest

All authors have no conflicts of interest.

Ethics approval

Approval for this study was obtained from the Institutional Review Board of Taipei Medical University (N202103132).

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Hong, JP., Huang, SW., Lee, CH. et al. Osteoporosis increases the risk of rotator cuff tears: a population-based cohort study. J Bone Miner Metab 40, 348–356 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00774-021-01293-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00774-021-01293-4

Keywords

  • Osteoporosis
  • Rotator cuff tears
  • Population-based study
  • Shoulder