Journal of Marine Science and Technology

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 115–126 | Cite as

Characteristics of wireless sensor network for full-scale ship application

  • Bu-Geun Paik
  • Seong-Rak Cho
  • Beom-Jin Park
  • Dongkon Lee
  • Byung-Dueg Bae
  • Jong-Hwui Yun
Original Article

Abstract

In this study, basic experiments regarding the wireless sensor network were conducted on a 3,000-ton-class training ship as the first step in applying the ubiquitous technology to a real ship. Various application fields of the technology in terms of the provision of safety and convenience on a ship were identified through these experiments. To efficiently adopt the ubiquitous technology for ship application, it is necessary to identify the state-of-the-art ubiquitous technology and to prepare countermeasures against the harsh environment of a ship. The characteristics of the wireless sensor network were investigated on a test bed ashore as well as on a real ship before full-scale ship application. In particular, experimental results concerning communication depth, data transmission ratio, and battery consumption in a sensor node are described in detail.

Keywords

Ubiquitous Ship Wireless sensor network Zigbee Monitoring 

References

  1. 1.
    MARINTEK (2000) Intelligent hull-monitoring systems for the reduced risk of structural failure, spill into the sea, and damage to cargo, and for improved passenger safety and comfort (HULLMON +). G3RD-CT-2000-00329, EU Framework ProgrammeGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Nguyen TV, Nelson HW (2001) A systems approach to machinery condition monitoring and diagnosis. In: NDIA: Proceedings of the 4th annual systems engineering conferenceGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Nielsen JK, Pedersen NH, Michelsen J, Nielsen UD, Baatrup J, Jensen JJ, Petersen ES (2006) Sea sense: real-time onboard decision support. Annual Report, Force TechnologyGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Cho SR, Lee DK, Paik BG, Yoo JH, Park YH, Park BJ (2007) A study on USN technologies for ships. In: Proceedings of ubiquitous intelligence and computing, Hong Kong, ChinaGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Hakem N, Misson M (2002) Study of the throughput of the wireless home automation network using the encapsulation of two medium-access methods. In: Proceedings of communication systems and networks, SpainGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Oppermann L, Broll G, Capra M, Benford S (2006) Extending authorizing tools for location-aware applications with an infrastructure visualization layer. In: Proceedings of ubiquitous computing, Orange County, CA, USAGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hodges S, Williams L, Berry E, Izadi S, Srinivasan J, Butler A, Smyth G, Kapur N, Wood K (2006) SenseCam: a retrospective memory aid. In: Proceedings of Ubiquitous Computing, Orange County, CA, USAGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Römer K, Friedemann M (2004) The design space of wireless sensor networks. IEEE Wirel Commun 11(6):54–61. doi:10.1109/MWC.2004.1368897 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Haenselmann T (2006) Sensornetworks. GFDL Wireless Sensor Network textbookGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© JASNAOE 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bu-Geun Paik
    • 1
  • Seong-Rak Cho
    • 1
  • Beom-Jin Park
    • 1
  • Dongkon Lee
    • 1
  • Byung-Dueg Bae
    • 2
  • Jong-Hwui Yun
    • 2
  1. 1.Maritime & Ocean Engineering Research InstituteKORDIDaejeonSouth Korea
  2. 2.Korea Maritime UniversityBusanSouth Korea

Personalised recommendations