Grundwasser

, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp 151–157 | Cite as

Matrix versus fracture permeability in a regional sandstone aquifer (Wajid sandstone, SW Saudi Arabia)

  • Hussain Al Ajmi
  • Matthias Hinderer
  • Randolf Rausch
  • Jens Hornung
  • Alexander Bassis
  • Martin Keller
  • Christoph Schüth
Technische Mitteilung

Abstract

Sandstones are often characterized as fractured aquifers. We present a case study of the Wajid sandstone, which forms a regional aquifer system in SW Saudi Arabia, where matrix, fracture, and large-scale hydraulic conductivities are coincident. The measurements deal with different scales and methods and are based on porosity and permeability measurements in the laboratory, as well as pumping tests in the field. Porosities of the sandstone samples in general are high and range between less than 5 % and more than 45 %. Gas permeabilities for strongly cemented samples are < 1 mD, whereas most samples range in between 500 and 5,000 mD. There is only a weak anisotropy with preference of the horizontal x-, y-directions. Hydraulic conductivities of the matrix samples (5.5 · 10−6 m/s and 1.1 · 10−5 m/s for the Upper and Lower Wajid sandstone, respectively) were in the same order of magnitude compared to hydraulic conductivities derived from pumping tests (8.3 · 10−5 m/s and 2.2 · 10−5 m/s for the Upper and Lower Wajid sandstone, respectively).

Keywords

Sandstone aquifer Hydraulic conductivity Matrix Fracture Saudi Arabia 

Matrix- versus Kluftdurchlässigkeit in einem regionalen Sandstein-Grundwasserleiter (Wajid-Sandstein, SW Saudi Arabien)

Zusammenfassung

Sandsteine können oft als Kluftgrundwasserleiter charakterisiert werden. Wir präsentieren das Fallbeispiel des Wajid Sandstein Aquifers, eines regionalen Sandstein-Grundwasserleiters in SW Saudi Arabien dessen Matrix-, Kluft- und Gebirgsdurchlässigkeiten in der gleichen Größenordnung liegen. Die Messungen erfassen unterschiedliche Skalen und basieren auf Porositäts- und Permeabilitätsmessungen im Labor sowie Pumpversuchen. Porositäten der Sandsteine sind generell hoch und reichen von weniger als 5 % bis zu mehr als 45 %. Bei den Gaspermeabilitäten liegen für stark zementierte Proben Werte < 1 mD vor, wobei die Permeabilitäten der meisten Proben zwischen 500 und 5.000 mD liegen. Es wurde nur eine leichte Anisotropie mit der Bevorzugung der horizonalen x-, y-Richtungen gefunden. Die hydraulischen Durchlässigkeiten von Matrixproben (5,5 · 106 m/s und 1,1 · 10−5 m/s für den Oberen, bzw. Unteren Wajid Sandstein) waren in der gleichen Größenordnung im Vergleich zu den Ergebnissen von Pumpversuchen (8,3 · 10−5 m/s bzw. 2,2 · 10−5 m/s für den Oberen und Unteren Wajid Sandstein).

References

  1. Al Saud, M., Rausch, R.: Integrated groundwater management in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Proceedings “Hydrogeology of Arid Environments”, 1–6, Borntraeger, Stuttgart (2012)Google Scholar
  2. Blum, P., Zeeb, C., Bons, P., Rausch, R.: How important are fractures for the fluid flow in a porous fractured sandstone aquifer? Geophys. Res. Abstr. 12, EGU2010. (2010)Google Scholar
  3. Castaing, C., Genter, A., Bourgine, B., Chilès, J.P., Wendling, J., Siegel, P.: Taking into account the complexity of natural fracture systems in reservoir single-phase flow modelling. J. Hydrol. 266, 83–98 (2002)Google Scholar
  4. Di Naccio, D., Boncio, P., Cirilli, S., Casaglia, F., Morettini, E., Lavecchia, G., Brozzetti, F.: Role of mechanical stratigraphy on fracture development in carbonate reservoirs: insights from outcropping shallow water carbonates in the Umbria–Marche Apennines, Italy. J. Volcanol. Geoth. Res. 148, 98–115 (2005)Google Scholar
  5. GIZ/DCo: Detailed water resources studies of Wajid and overlying aquifers. Final report for the Ministry of Water and Electricity, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (2010)Google Scholar
  6. Gross, M.R., Fischer, M.P., Engelder, T., Greenfield, R.J.: Factors controlling joint spacing in interbedded sedimentary rocks; integrating numerical models with field observations from the Monterey Formation, USA. In: Ameen, M.S. (ed.) Fractography: fracture topography as a tool in fracture mechanics and stress analysis. Geol. Soc. Special Pub. 92, 215–233 (1995)Google Scholar
  7. Italconsult: Water and Agricultural Development Surveys for Areas II and III. Ministry of Water & Agriculture, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (unpublished) (1969)Google Scholar
  8. Keller, M., Hinderer, M., Al Ajmi, H., Rausch, R.: Paleozoic glacial depositional environments of SW Saudi Arabia: Process and Product. Spec. Publ. Geol. Soc. London 354, 129–152 (2011)Google Scholar
  9. Kellogg, K.S., Janjou, D., Minoux, L., Fourniguet, J.: Explanatory notes to the Geologic Map of the Wadi Tathlith Quadrangle, sheet 20 G, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, p. 27. Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources, Deputy Ministry for Mineral Resources (1986)Google Scholar
  10. Klinkenberg, L.J.: The permeability of porous media to liquids and gases. API Drilling Production Practice, pp. 200–213 (1941)Google Scholar
  11. MoWE—Ministry of Water & Electricity: Detailed Water Resources Studies of Wajid and Overlying Aquifers, Vol. 16. Riyadh (in association with GTZ/DCO—Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit & Dornier Consulting) (unpublished) (2010).Google Scholar
  12. Sahin, A., Saner, S.: Statistical distributions and correlations of petrophysical parameters in the Arab-D reservoir, Abqaiq field, Eastern Saudi Arabia. J. Petrol. Geol. 24(1), 101–114 (2001)Google Scholar
  13. Sharland, P.R., Archer, R., Casey, D.M., Davies, R.B., Hall, S.H., Heward, A.P., Horbury, A.D., Simmons, M.D.: Arabian Plate Sequence Stratigraphy. Geoarabia, Special Publication 2 (2001)Google Scholar
  14. Toublanc, A., Renaud, S., Sylte, J.E., Clausen, C.K., Eiben, T., Nadland, G.: Ekofisk field: Fracture permeability evaluation and implementation in the flow model. Petrol. Geol. 11, 321–330 (2005)Google Scholar
  15. Zeeb, C., Göckus, D., Bons, P., Al Ajmi, H., Rausch, R., Blum, P.: Fracture flow modelling based on satellite images of the Wajid Sandstone, Saudi Arabia. Hydrogeol. J. 18, 1699–1712 (2010)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hussain Al Ajmi
    • 1
  • Matthias Hinderer
    • 2
  • Randolf Rausch
    • 3
  • Jens Hornung
    • 2
  • Alexander Bassis
    • 2
  • Martin Keller
    • 4
  • Christoph Schüth
    • 2
  1. 1.Ministry of Water & ElectricityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Institut für Angewandte GeowissenschaftenTU DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany
  3. 3.Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)RiyadhSaudi Arabia
  4. 4.Abteilung Krustendynamik, Geozentrum NordbayernUniversität ErlangenErlangenGermany

Personalised recommendations