Long-acting olanzapine injection during pregnancy and breastfeeding: a case report

  • Irina Manouilenko
  • Inger Öhman
  • Jeanette Georgieva
Short Communication

Abstract

We present one case of a woman treated with the intramuscular depot formulation of the atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine pamoate (ZypAdhera®), during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Data on olanzapine distribution in breast milk as well as on plasma concentration in the nursed infant are provided. The present case report demonstrates that olanzapine was excreted in the breast milk, but the breast-fed infant had very low olanzapine concentrations, which did not result in any adverse effects.

Keywords

Olanzapine Breastfeeding Pregnancy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank head of Järva Psychiatric Out-patient Clinic, Dr. Kersti Gabrielsson, and head of the Psychosis Department at Järva Psychiatric Out-patient Clinic, Helena Persson, for support, and Camilla Rosales for assistance in data managing.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Irina Manouilenko, Inger Öhman and Jeanette Georgieva declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from the individual participant included in the study. Additional informed consent was obtained from the individual participant for whom identifying information is included in this article.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeuroscienceKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Southern Stockholm Psychiatric ClinicStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Department of Medicine, Centre for PharmacoepidemiologyKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Northern Stockholm Psychiatric ClinicStockholmSweden

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