Archives of Women's Mental Health

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 75–78 | Cite as

Is the perimenopause a time of increased risk of recurrence in women with a history of bipolar affective postpartum psychosis? A case series

  • E. Robertson Blackmore
  • N. Craddock
  • J. Walters
  • I. Jones
Short communication

Summary

There is increasing awareness of the influence of female reproductive life events on the course of bipolar disorder. Here, we describe the case histories of 5 women diagnosed with postpartum psychosis who subsequently experienced major mood disorders in relation to the perimenopause. This case series suggests that (a) the perimenopause may be a time of increased risk for women who experienced postpartum bipolar episodes and (b) periods of hormonal change represent a major trigger for bipolar episodes in some women.

Keywords: Bipolar disorder; menopause; relapse; postpartum psychosis; perimenopause 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Robertson Blackmore
    • 1
  • N. Craddock
    • 2
  • J. Walters
    • 2
  • I. Jones
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of Psychological MedicineCardiff UniversityCardiffU.K.

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