Premenstrual mood symptoms: study of familiality and personality correlates in mood disorder pedigrees

  • Jennifer L. Payne
  • Sarah R. Klein
  • Rachel B. Zamoiski
  • Peter P. Zandi
  • Oscar J. Bienvenu
  • Dean F. MacKinnon
  • Francis M. Mondimore
  • Barbara Schweizer
  • Karen L. Swartz
  • NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder Consortium
  • Raymond P. Crowe
  • William A. Scheftner
  • Myrna M. Weissman
  • Douglas F. Levinson
  • J. Raymond DePauloJr.
  • James B. Potash
Original Contribution

Abstract

We sought to determine whether premenstrual mood symptoms exhibit familial aggregation in bipolar disorder or major depression pedigrees. Two thousand eight hundred seventy-six women were interviewed with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies as part of either the NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder Collaborative study or the Genetics of Early Onset Major Depression (GenRED) study and asked whether they had experienced severe mood symptoms premenstrually. In families with two or more female siblings with bipolar disorder (BP) or major depressive disorder (MDD), we examined the odds of having premenstrual mood symptoms given one or more siblings with these symptoms. For the GenRED MDD sample we also assessed the impact of personality as measured by the NEO-FFI. Premenstrual mood symptoms did not exhibit familial aggregation in families with BP or MDD. We unexpectedly found an association between high NEO openness scores and premenstrual mood symptoms, but neither this factor, nor NEO neuroticism influenced evidence for familial aggregation of symptoms. Limitations include the retrospective interview, the lack of data on premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and the inability to control for factors such as medication use.

Keywords

Premenstrual Bipolar Major depression Genetics 

References

  1. Ainscough CE (1990) Premenstrual emotional changes a prospective study of symptomatology in normal women. J Psychosom Res 34(1):35–45PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. American Psychiatric Association (1994) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edn. American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  3. Bagby RM, Schuller DR, Levitt AJ, Joffe RT, Harkness KL (1996) Seasonal and non-seasonal depression and the five-factor model of personality. J Affect Disord 38(2–3):89–95PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bienvenu OJ, Samuels JF, Costa PT, Reti IM, Eaton WW, Nestadt G (2004) Anxiety and depressive disorders and the five-factor model of personality: a higher- and lower-order personality trait investigation in a community sample. Depress Anxiety 20(2):92–97PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Condon JT (1993) The premenstrual syndrome: a twin study. Br J Psychiatry 162:481–486 481–486PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Costa PT Jr, McCrae RR (1988) Personality in adulthood: a six-year longitudinal study of self-reports and spouse ratings on the NEO Personality Inventory. J Pers Soc Psychol 54(5):853–863PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dalton K, Dalton ME, Guthrie K (1987) Incidence of the premenstrual syndrome in twins. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 295(6605):1027–1028Google Scholar
  8. Damberg M, Westberg L, Berggard C, Landen M, Sundblad C, Eriksson O, Naessen T, Ekman A, Eriksson E (2005) Investigation of transcription factor AP-2 beta genotype in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Neurosci Lett 377(1):49–52PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Dick DM, Foroud T, Flury L, Bowman ES, Miller MJ, Rau NL, Moe PR, Samavedy N, El-Mallakh R, Manji H, Glitz DA, Meyer ET, Smiley C, Hahn R, Widmark C, McKinney R, Sutton L, Ballas C, Grice D, Berrettini W, Byerley W, Coryell W, DePaulo R, MacKinnon DF, Gershon ES, Kelsoe JR, McMahon FJ, McInnis M, Murphy DL, Reich T, Scheftner W, Nurnberger JI Jr (2003) Genomewide linkage analyses of bipolar disorder: a new sample of 250 pedigrees from the National Institute of Mental Health Genetics Initiative. Am J Hum Genet 73(1):107–114PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Enns MW, Cox BJ, Levitt AJ, Levitan RD, Morehouse R, Michalak EE, Lam RW (2006) Personality and seasonal affective disorder: results from the CAN-SAD study. J Affect Disord 93(1–3):35–42PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Glick H, Endicott J, Nee J (1993) Premenstrual changes: are they familial. Acta Psychiatr Scand 88(3):149–155PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Halbreich U, Endicott J (1985) Methodological issues in studies of premenstrual changes. Psychoneuroendocrinology 10(1):15–32PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Holmans P, Weissman MM, Zubenko GS, Scheftner WA, Crowe RR, DePaulo JR Jr, Knowles JA, Zubenko WN, Murphy-Eberenz K, Marta DH, Boutelle S, McInnis MG, Adams P, Gladis M, Steele J, Miller EB, Potash JB, Mackinnon DF, Levinson DF (2007) Genetics of recurrent early-onset major depression (GenRED): final genome scan report. Am J Psychiatry 164(2):248–258PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Huo L, Straub RE, Roca C, Schmidt PJ, Shi K, Vakkalanka R, Weinberger DR, Rubinow DR (2007) Risk for premenstrual dysphoric disorder is associated with genetic variation in ESR1, the estrogen receptor alpha gene. Biol Psychiatry 62(8):925–933PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Jain U, Blais MA, Otto MW, Hirshfeld DR, Sachs GS (1999) Five-factor personality traits in patients with seasonal depression: treatment effects and comparisons with bipolar patients. J Affect Disord 55(1):51–54PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Kendler KS, Silberg JL, Neale MC, Kessler RC, Heath AC, Eaves LJ (1992) Genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of menstrual, premenstrual and neurotic symptoms: a population-based twin study. Psychol Med 22(1):85–100PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kendler KS, Karkowski LM, Corey LA, Neale MC (1998) Longitudinal population-based twin study of retrospectively reported premenstrual symptoms and lifetime major depression. Am J Psychiatry 155(9):1234–1240PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Levinson DF, Zubenko GS, Crowe RR, DePaulo RJ, Scheftner WS, Weissman MM, Holmans P, Zubenko WN, Boutelle S, Murphy-Eberenz K, MacKinnon D, McInnis MG, Marta DH, Adams P, Sassoon S, Knowles JA, Thomas J, Chellis J (2003) Genetics of recurrent early-onset depression (GenRED): design and preliminary clinical characteristics of a repository sample for genetic linkage studies. Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 119(1):118–130CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Magnay JL, Ismail KM, Chapman G, Cioni L, Jones PW, O’Brien S (2006) Serotonin transporter, tryptophan hydroxylase, and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms in premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Am. J Obstet Gynecol 195(5):1254–1259PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. McInnis MG, Dick DM, Willour VL, Avramopoulos D, MacKinnon DF, Simpson SG, Potash JB, Edenberg HJ, Bowman ES, McMahon FJ, Smiley C, Chellis JL, Huo Y, Diggs T, Meyer ET, Miller M, Matteini AT, Rau NL, DePaulo JR, Gershon ES, Badner JA, Rice JP, Goate AM, Tera-Wadleigh SD, Nurnberger JI, Reich T, Zandi PP, Foroud TM (2003) Genome-wide scan and conditional analysis in bipolar disorder: evidence for genomic interaction in the National Institute of Mental Health genetics initiative bipolar pedigrees. Biol Psychiatry 54(11):1265–1273PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Murphy-Eberenz K, Zandi PP, March D, Crowe RR, Scheftner WA, Alexander M, McInnis MG, Coryell W, Adams P, DePaulo JR Jr, Miller EB, Marta DH, Potash JB, Payne J, Levinson DF (2006) Is perinatal depression familial. J Affect Disord 90(1):49–55PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Nurnberger JI Jr, Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA, York-Cooler C, Simpson SG, Harkavy-Friedman J, Severe JB, Malaspina D, Reich T (1994) Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry 51(11):849–859PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Payne JL, Mackinnon DF, Mondimore FM, McInnis MG, Schweizer B, McMahon FJ, Nurnberger JI, Rice JP, Scheftner WA, Coryell W, Berrettini WH, Kelsoe JR, Byerley W, Murphy W, Gershon ES, DePaulo JR Jr, Potash JB (2008) Familial aggregation of postpartum mood symptoms in families with bipolar disorder. J Bipolar Disord 10(1):38–44Google Scholar
  24. Praschak-Rieder N, Willeit M, Neumeister A, Hilger E, Stastny J, Thierry N, Lenzinger E, Kasper S (2001) Prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder in female patients with seasonal affective disorder. J Affect Disord 63(1–3):239–242PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Praschak-Rieder N, Willeit M, Winkler D, Neumeister A, Hilger E, Zill P, Hornik K, Stastny J, Thierry N, Ackenheil M, Bondy B, Kasper S (2002) Role of family history and 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in female seasonal affective disorder patients with and without premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 12(2):129–134PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Rubinow DR, Roy-Byrne P, Hoban MC, Gold PW, Post RM (1984) Prospective assessment of menstrually related mood disorders. Am J Psychiatry 141(5):684–686PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Takeo C, Negishi E, Nakajima A, Ueno K, Tatsuno I, Saito Y, Amano K, Hirai A (2005) Association of cytosine-adenine repeat polymorphism of the estrogen receptor-beta gene with menopausal symptoms. Gend Med 2(2):96–105PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Treloar SA, Heath AC, Martin NG (2002) Genetic and environmental influences on premenstrual symptoms in an Australian twin sample. Psychol Med 32(1):25–38PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Trull TJ, Sher KJ (1994) Relationship between the five-factor model of personality and Axis I disorders in a nonclinical sample. J Abnorm Psychol 103(2):350–360PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. van den Akker OB, Stein GS, Neale MC, Murray RM (1987) Genetic and environmental variation in menstrual cycle: histories of two British twin samples. Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma ). 36(4):541–548Google Scholar
  31. van den Akker OB, Eves FF, Stein GS, Murray RM (1995) Genetic and environmental factors in premenstrual symptom reporting and its relationship to depression and a general neuroticism trait. J Psychosom Res 39(4):477–487PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Widholm O, Kantero RL (1971) A statistical analysis of the menstrual patterns of 8,000 Finnish girls and their mothers. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand Suppl 14(Suppl 14):1–36 Suppl-36PubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Zeger SL, Liang KY (1986) Longitudinal data analysis for discrete and continuous outcomes. Biometrics 42(1):121–130PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer L. Payne
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sarah R. Klein
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rachel B. Zamoiski
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter P. Zandi
    • 3
  • Oscar J. Bienvenu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dean F. MacKinnon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Francis M. Mondimore
    • 1
    • 2
  • Barbara Schweizer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Karen L. Swartz
    • 1
    • 2
  • NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder Consortium
  • Raymond P. Crowe
    • 4
  • William A. Scheftner
    • 5
  • Myrna M. Weissman
    • 6
    • 7
  • Douglas F. Levinson
    • 8
  • J. Raymond DePauloJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  • James B. Potash
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of MedicineJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mental HealthJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Bloomberg School of Public HealthJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health Clinical Research CenterUniversity of Iowa Carver College of MedicineIowa CityUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryRush-Presbyterian Medical CenterChicagoUSA
  6. 6.Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.New York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA
  8. 8.Department of PsychiatryStanford University School of MedicinePalo AltoUSA

Personalised recommendations