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Sporoderm development in Acer tataricum (Aceraceae): an interpretation

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Abstract

For the first time, the developmental events in the course of complicated exine structure establishment have been traced in detail with transmission electron microscope in the representative of Acer. A new look at unfolding events is suggested using the knowledge of a boundary field, colloid science. Our purpose was to find out whether the sequence of sporoderm developmental events represents, in essence, the sequence of self-assembling micellar mesophases, initiated by genomically given physicochemical parameters and induced by surfactant glycoproteins at increasing concentration. Indeed, the first units observed in the periplasmic space are globular ones (=spherical micelles) which become arranged into rod-like units (=cylindrical micelles). Then, twisted clusters of rodlets form a layer of procolumellae (middle micellar mesophase). The tectum emerges as an untwisting and merging of distal ends of procolumellae (distal untwist of micelle clusters). In the end of tetrad period, when a hydrophilic–hydrophobic switch occurs in the periplasmic space, the contrast reversal of the columellae corresponds to the change of normal micelles to reverse ones. The initiation of the foot layer and the endexine lamellae, with their typical central “white lines”, corresponds to the next—“neat”—mesophase, with its typical central gaps between layers. Aperture sites during development show all the main micellar mesophases and their transitional forms. The data received have supported our previous hypothesis.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by RFBR grant No. 08-04-00498. We also thank our engineer Peter Tzinman for assistance with Hitachi H-600 TEM.

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Correspondence to Nina I. Gabarayeva.

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Gabarayeva, N.I., Grigorjeva, V.V. & Rowley, J.R. Sporoderm development in Acer tataricum (Aceraceae): an interpretation. Protoplasma 247, 65–81 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00709-010-0141-9

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