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Atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation can disrupt tobacco mosaic virus particles and RNAs to inactivate their infectivity

  • Sara E. Hanbal
  • Keisuke Takashima
  • Shuhei Miyashita
  • Sugihiro Ando
  • Kumiko Ito
  • Mohsen M. Elsharkawy
  • Toshiro Kaneko
  • Hideki Takahashi
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Abstract

Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure air plasma is a source of charged and neutral gas species. In this study, N-carrying tobacco plants were inoculated with plasma irradiated and non-irradiated tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) solution, resulting in necrotic local lesions on non-irradiated, but not on irradiated, TMV-inoculated leaves. Virus particles were disrupted by plasma irradiation in an exposure-dependent manner, but the viral coat protein subunit was not. TMV RNA was also fragmented in a time-dependent manner. These results indicate that plasma irradiation of TMV can collapse viral particles to the subunit level, degrading TMV RNA and thereby leading to a loss of infectivity.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was financially supported by grants for “Scientific Research on Innovative Areas” from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Science, Sports and Technology (MEXT), Japan (grant numbers 16H06429, 16K21723, and 16H06435), and by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the JSPS Core-to-Core Program (Advanced Research Networks) entitled “Establishment of international agricultural immunology research-core for a quantum improvement in food safety”. This work was also supported by the Egyptian Government.

Funding

This study was funded by grants for “Scientific Research on Innovative Areas” from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Science, Sports and Technology (MEXT), Japan (grant numbers 16H06429, 16K21723, and 16H06435), and by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the JSPS Core-to-Core Program (Advanced Research Networks) entitled “Establishment of international agricultural immunology research-core for a quantum improvement in food safety”. This work was also supported by the Egyptian Government.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Takahashi, H. has received research grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Science, Sports and Technology (MEXT), Japan and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). Hanbal, S.E. has received a Shuttle Research Program from the Egyptian Government. All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

Supplementary material

705_2018_3909_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (24.4 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 25006 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Virus and PhytoplasmaPlant Pathology Research Institute, Agriculture Research CenterGizaEgypt
  3. 3.Graduate School of EngineeringTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Agricultural Botany, Faculty of AgricultureKafrelsheikh UniversityKafrelsheikhEgypt

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