Molecular characterization of an imported dengue virus serotype 4 isolate from Thailand

  • Ling Mo
  • Jiandong Shi
  • Xiaofang Guo
  • Zhaoping Zeng
  • Ningzhu Hu
  • Jing Sun
  • Meini Wu
  • Hongning Zhou
  • Yunzhang Hu
Annotated Sequence Record

Abstract

The epidemic of dengue virus infections has spread markedly in Yunnan province of China in recent years due to an increase in the number of imported dengue cases. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report a whole genome sequence and molecular characterization of an imported DENV-4 isolate from Thailand. The current strain, 2013JH285, has an RNA genome of 10,772 nucleotides that shares 99.0% nucleotide and 99.7% amino acid sequence identity with the 2013 Thailand strain CTI2-13. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome sequence revealed that the 2013JH285 strain belongs to genotype I of DENV-4. Recombination analysis suggested that the 2013JH285 strain originated from inter-genotypic recombination of DENV-4 strains. The new complete DENV-4 genome sequence reported here might contribute to further understanding of the molecular epidemiology and disease surveillance of DENV-4 in China.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the CAMS Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (2017-I2M-3-022), the Peking Union Medical College Youth Fund (3332016113), the State Project for Essential Drug Research and Development (SQ2018ZX091510), the National Key Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2016YFC1202300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31500724), and the Yunnan Applied Basic Research Projects (2017FB115).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

No potential conflicts of interest are disclosed.

Ethical approval

The research obtained ethical approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee (Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College). Written informed consent was available from the patient.

Supplementary material

705_2018_3906_MOESM1_ESM.doc (34 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 34 kb)
705_2018_3906_MOESM2_ESM.docx (20 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 19 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ling Mo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jiandong Shi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiaofang Guo
    • 3
  • Zhaoping Zeng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ningzhu Hu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jing Sun
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Meini Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hongning Zhou
    • 3
  • Yunzhang Hu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Medical BiologyChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical CollegeKunmingChina
  2. 2.Yunnan Key Laboratory of Vaccine Research and Development of Severe Infectious DiseaseKunmingChina
  3. 3.Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory of Vector-borne Diseases Control and Research, Yunnan Provincial Center of Arborvirus ResearchYunnan Institute of Parasitic DiseasesPu’erChina

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