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Archives of Virology

, Volume 163, Issue 9, pp 2395–2404 | Cite as

Assessing the efficacy of a live vaccine against avian encephalomyelitis virus

  • Wencheng Lin
  • Piaopiao Lu
  • Aijun Li
  • Yu Wu
  • Hongxin Li
  • Feng Chen
  • Jingyun Ma
  • Qingmei Xie
Original Article

Abstract

Avian encephalomyelitis virus (AEV) causes typical neurological symptoms in young chicks and a transient drop in egg production and hatchability in adult laying birds, resulting in huge economic losses in the poultry industry. An effective way to control and prevent this disease is vaccination of the flocks. Here, we assessed the efficacy of the live vaccine candidate strain GDt29 against avian encephalomyelitis virus. The GDt29 strain has low virulence, was confirmed safe, and showed no signs of pathogenicity. High titers of AEV-specific antibodies were detected in GDt29-vaccinated hens (S/P > 3.0) and their progeny (S/P > 2.0). Moreover, the eggs of GDt29-vaccinated hens with high levels of maternal antibodies were hatched successfully regardless of challenge with a heterologous AEV strain, and the GDt29 attenuated vaccine showed higher protective efficacy against AEV than the commercial vaccine. Furthermore, contact-exposed chicks bred with GDt29-vaccinated birds generated high titers against AE virus (S/P > 2.8). Collectively, our studies are proof of the principle that GDt29 might be an ideal vaccine candidate to prevent AEV infection, and they highlight the utility of using a live vaccine against AEV.

Notes

Funding

This study was supported by National Key R&D Program of China (2017YFD0502001) and by Guangdong Province Science and Technology Plan Project (2015A020209137, 2016A050502042, 2016A020210125).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Ethical approval

All animal experiments were approved by the Committee of the Ethics on Animal Care and Experiments at South China Agricultural University (approval ID: 201004152). All study procedures and animal care activities were conducted in accordance with the national and institutional guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wencheng Lin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Piaopiao Lu
    • 1
  • Aijun Li
    • 5
  • Yu Wu
    • 1
  • Hongxin Li
    • 1
  • Feng Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jingyun Ma
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Qingmei Xie
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.College of Animal ScienceSouth China Agricultural UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Agro-Animal Genomics and Molecular BreedingGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Animal Health Aquaculture and Environmental ControlGuangdongPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.South China Collaborative Innovation Center for Poultry Disease Control and Product SafetyGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.College of Science and EngineeringJinan UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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