Archives of Virology

, Volume 162, Issue 5, pp 1381–1385 | Cite as

Reintroduction of highly pathogenic avian influenza A/H5N8 virus of clade 2.3.4.4. in Russia

  • Vasiliy Y. Marchenko
  • Ivan M. Susloparov
  • Andrey B. Komissarov
  • Artem Fadeev
  • Nataliya I. Goncharova
  • Andrey V. Shipovalov
  • Svetlana V. Svyatchenko
  • Alexander G. Durymanov
  • Tatyana N. Ilyicheva
  • Lyudmila K. Salchak
  • Elena P. Svintitskaya
  • Valeriy N. Mikheev
  • Alexander B. Ryzhikov
Brief Report

Abstract

In the spring of 2016, a loss of wild birds was observed during the monitoring of avian influenza virus activity in the Republic of Tyva. That outbreak was caused by influenza H5N8 virus of clade 2.3.4.4. In the fall, viruses of H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 were propagated in European countries. This paper presents some results of analysis of the virus strains isolated during the spring and fall seasons in 2016 in the Russian Federation. The investigated strains were highly pathogenic for mice, and some of their antigenic and genetic features differed from those of an H5N8 strain that circulated in 2014 in Russia.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasiliy Y. Marchenko
    • 1
  • Ivan M. Susloparov
    • 1
  • Andrey B. Komissarov
    • 2
  • Artem Fadeev
    • 2
  • Nataliya I. Goncharova
    • 1
  • Andrey V. Shipovalov
    • 1
  • Svetlana V. Svyatchenko
    • 1
  • Alexander G. Durymanov
    • 1
  • Tatyana N. Ilyicheva
    • 1
  • Lyudmila K. Salchak
    • 3
  • Elena P. Svintitskaya
    • 4
  • Valeriy N. Mikheev
    • 1
  • Alexander B. Ryzhikov
    • 1
  1. 1.State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VectorNovosibirskRussian Federation
  2. 2.Research Institute of InfluenzaSaint PetersburgRussian Federation
  3. 3.Tyva Republic Regional office of Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing (Rospotrebnadzor)KyzylRussian Federation
  4. 4.Hygienic and Epidemiological center of Tyva RepublicKyzylRussian Federation

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