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Archives of Virology

, 153:715 | Cite as

Picornavirales, a proposed order of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses with a pseudo-T = 3 virion architecture

  • Olivier Le Gall
  • Peter Christian
  • Claude M. Fauquet
  • Andrew M. Q. King
  • Nick J. Knowles
  • Nobuhiko Nakashima
  • Glyn Stanway
  • Alexander E. Gorbalenya
Original Article

Abstract

Despite the apparent natural grouping of “picorna-like” viruses, the taxonomical significance of this putative “supergroup” was never addressed adequately. We recently proposed to the ICTV that an order should be created and named Picornavirales, to include viruses infecting eukaryotes that share similar properties: (i) a positive-sense RNA genome, usually with a 5′-bound VPg and 3′-polyadenylated, (ii) genome translation into autoproteolytically processed polyprotein(s), (iii) capsid proteins organized in a module containing three related jelly-roll domains which form small icosahedral, non-enveloped particles with a pseudo-T = 3 symmetry, and (iv) a three-domain module containing a superfamily III helicase, a (cysteine) proteinase with a chymotrypsin-like fold and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. According to the above criteria, the order Picornavirales includes the families Picornaviridae, Comoviridae, Dicistroviridae, Marnaviridae, Sequiviridae and the unassigned genera Cheravirus, Iflavirus and Sadwavirus. Other taxa of “picorna-like” viruses, e.g. Potyviridae, Caliciviridae, Hypoviridae, do not conform to several of the above criteria and are more remotely related: therefore they are not being proposed as members of the new order. Newly described viruses, not yet assigned to an existing taxon by ICTV, may belong to the proposed order.

Keywords

Capsid Protein Sapovirus Capsid Protein Sequence Deviant Property Unassigned Genus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the members of the ICTV study groups on Picornaviridae, insect picorna-like viruses, plant picorna-like viruses, Potyviridae, Caliciviridae and Hypoviridae for their helpful discussions and comments, which we hope this proposal reflects at best. The creation of the order Picornavirales as defined in this report has recently been approved by ICTV under code number 2005.200G.02 after consultation by the entire virological community on the ICTVnet web site [66].

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivier Le Gall
    • 1
  • Peter Christian
    • 2
  • Claude M. Fauquet
    • 3
  • Andrew M. Q. King
    • 4
  • Nick J. Knowles
    • 4
  • Nobuhiko Nakashima
    • 5
  • Glyn Stanway
    • 6
  • Alexander E. Gorbalenya
    • 7
  1. 1.UMR GDPP INRA Univ. Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2INRAVillenave d’Ornon CedexFrance
  2. 2.National Institute for Biological Standards and ControlHertsUK
  3. 3.ILTAB, Danforth Plant Science CenterSt LouisUSA
  4. 4.Institute for Animal HealthPirbrightUK
  5. 5.National Institute of Agrobiological SciencesTsukubaJapan
  6. 6.University of EssexColchesterUK
  7. 7.Department of Medical MicrobiologyLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands

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