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Archives of Virology

, Volume 150, Issue 2, pp 247–259 | Cite as

A temperature-dependent inhibitory activity of serum on the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived hepatitis B surface antigen to bind to monocytes

  • P. Vanlandschoot
  • F. Van Houtte
  • A. Roobrouck
  • F. Stelter
  • F. Gavilanes
  • G. Leroux-Roels
Article

Summary.

Hepatitis B surface antigen, when produced in yeast (rHBsAg), is capable of binding to cells that express the lipopolysaccharide coreceptor CD14. This interaction is enhanced by a serum protein, the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP). Here we report that most of the rHBsAg particles that attached to monocytes at 0 °C, were not endocytosed but were released back into the serum-containing binding buffer at 37 °C. Additionally, serum-dependent binding at 37 °C was weak when compared to the serum-dependent attachment at 0 °C. Pre-incubation at 37 °C of cells together with serum did not abolish binding of freshly added rHBsAg at 0 °C. However, pre-incubation of rHBsAg with serum at 37 °C reduced attachment to cells following incubation at 0 °C. Soluble CD14 and LBP, two serum proteins which can act as phospholipid transfer molecules, were shown not to be responsible for the inhibitory effect. Pre-incubation at 37 °C of rHBsAg in serum-free hepatoma cell line-conditioned media resulted in a pronounced reduction in subsequent binding to cells at 0 °C. These observations suggest that the temperature-dependent inhibitory effect is caused by serum factors that are probably secreted by hepatocytes.

Keywords

Hepatitis Infectious Disease Inhibitory Activity Serum Protein Surface Antigen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Vanlandschoot
    • 1
  • F. Van Houtte
    • 1
  • A. Roobrouck
    • 1
  • F. Stelter
    • 2
  • F. Gavilanes
    • 3
  • G. Leroux-Roels
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Vaccinology, Department of Clinical Biology, Microbiology and ImmunologyGhent University HospitalGhentBelgium
  2. 2.Institute of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-UniversityGreifswaldGermany
  3. 3.Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia MolecularUniversidad ComplutenseMadridSpain

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