High temperature extremes in the Czech Republic 1961–2010 and their synoptic variants

Abstract

Our research focuses on the analysis of extreme high maximum air temperature events (EXHTEs) in the Czech Republic in the period 1961–2010, their climatological characteristics, and on the identification of synoptic-scale circulation conditions conductive to them. EXHTEs are detected using the Weather Extremity Index (WEI) combining return periods of daily maximum air temperature, duration of events, and the extent of the affected area. We selected 37 EXHTEs as non-overlapping periods with the highest WEI. Some long EXHTEs were divided into several shorter synoptically homogeneous episodes. Using the two-level divisive clustering of 700 hPa air temperature and wind field anomalies, we obtained four main variants of synoptic-scale circulation conditions. The most frequent variant associated with extreme episodes is characterized by a westerly flow connected with a high pressure ridge extending northeastward from North Africa over Central Europe or with an anticyclone centered over the Central Mediterranean. The most extreme episodes occurred during the variant characterized by an easterly flow between a high pressure area to the northeast and a low pressure area to the southeast.

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Acknowledgments

The observed data of daily maximum air temperature were provided by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute. The work has been supported by grant P209/11/1990 funded by the Czech Science Foundation.

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Correspondence to A. Valeriánová.

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Valeriánová, A., Crhová, L., Holtanová, E. et al. High temperature extremes in the Czech Republic 1961–2010 and their synoptic variants. Theor Appl Climatol 127, 17–29 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00704-015-1614-8

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Keywords

  • Return Period
  • Heat Wave
  • Membership Degree
  • Generalize Extreme Value
  • Generalize Extreme Value Distribution