Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 121, Issue 6, pp 655–664 | Cite as

A distinct variant of mixed dysarthria reflects parkinsonism and dystonia due to ephedrone abuse

  • Jan Rusz
  • Marika Megrelishvili
  • Cecilia Bonnet
  • Michael Okujava
  • Hana Brožová
  • Irine Khatiashvili
  • Madona Sekhniashvili
  • Marina Janelidze
  • Eduardo Tolosa
  • Evžen Růžička
Neurology and Preclinical Neurological Studies - Original Article

Abstract

A distinctive alteration of speech has been reported in patients suffering from ephedrone-induced parkinsonism. However, an objective assessment of dysarthria has not been performed in ephedrone users. We studied 28 young Caucasian men from Georgia with a previous history of ephedrone abuse and compared them to 25 age-matched healthy controls. Speech examination, brain MRI, and NNIPPS-Parkinson plus scale were performed in all patients. The accurate differential diagnosis of dysarthria subtypes was based on the quantitative acoustic analyses of 15 speech dimensions. We revealed a distinct variant of mixed dysarthria with a combination of hyperkinetic and hypokinetic components representing the altered motor programming of dystonia and bradykinesia in ephedrone-induced parkinsonism. According to acoustic analyses, all patients presented at least one affected speech dimension, whereas dysarthria was moderate in 43 % and severe in 36 % of patients. Further findings indicated relationships between motor subscores of dystonia and bradykinesia and speech components of loudness (r = −0.54, p < 0.01), articulation (r = 0.40, p < 0.05), and timing (r = −0.53, p < 0.01). In ephedrone-induced parkinsonism a prominent mixed hyperkinetic–hypokinetic dysarthria occurs that appears related to marked dystonia and bradykinesia and probably reflects manganese induced toxic and neurodegenerative damage to the globus pallidus internus and substantia nigra.

Keywords

Speech disorder Dystonia Manganese Methcathinone Ephedrone Acoustic analysis 

Supplementary material

702_2014_1158_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (289 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 288 kb)
702_2014_1158_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (13 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PDF 12 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Rusz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marika Megrelishvili
    • 3
    • 4
  • Cecilia Bonnet
    • 2
  • Michael Okujava
    • 3
    • 5
  • Hana Brožová
    • 2
  • Irine Khatiashvili
    • 3
    • 4
  • Madona Sekhniashvili
    • 4
  • Marina Janelidze
    • 4
  • Eduardo Tolosa
    • 6
  • Evžen Růžička
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Circuit Theory, Faculty of Electrical EngineeringCzech Technical University in PraguePragueCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of MedicineCharles University in PraguePragueCzech Republic
  3. 3.Institute of Medical ResearchIlia State UniversityTbilisiGeorgia
  4. 4.Department of NeurologyS. Khechinashvili University HospitalTbilisiGeorgia
  5. 5.Research Institute of Clinical MedicineTbilisiGeorgia
  6. 6.Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED)Universitat de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain

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