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Scanning electron microscopy of pollen structure throws light on resolving BambusaDendrocalamus complex: bamboo flowering evidence

Abstract

Since the introduction of the new genus Sinocalamus in 1940 which is now dissociated into Bambusa and Dendrocalamus, molecular markers have long been unable to discern members of the BambusaDendrocalamus complex. Rapid concerted evolution governed by high level of transition/transversion at the noncoding DNA regions has limited the ability of internal transcribed spacer (rDNA) and trnL-F intergenic spacer to resolve Bambusa and Dendrocalamus in phylogenetic analysis. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of Bambusa vulgaris and Dendrocalamus manipureanus pollen development, we provided the evidence that there exists genus specificity in the development and structure of woody bamboo pollen which can serve as a benchmark for allocated new species into the genus Bambusa and Dendrocalamus substantiating molecular data.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Government of India, in the form of a postdoctoral fellowship to Sayanika Devi Waikhom. The author, Bengyella Louis is grateful to the the World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) and DBT, Government of India (Program No.3240223450), for his research fellowship. The authors are thankful to DK Hore, N Mazumder and Debajyoti Biswas for proofreading the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Bengyella Louis.

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a

Fig. S1 SEM micrograph of B. arundinacea pollen courtesy of Nadgauda et al. (1997) obtained from a In vivo developed florets and b In vitro developed florets. c SEM micrograph courtesy of Skvarla et al. (2003) for Pariana stenolemma showing non-annulated aperture. d SEM micrograph courtesy of Worobiec et al. (2009) for pollen fossil of Graminidites bambusoides Stuchlik. (TIFF 126 kb)

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Waikhom, S.D., Louis, B., Roy, P. et al. Scanning electron microscopy of pollen structure throws light on resolving BambusaDendrocalamus complex: bamboo flowering evidence. Plant Syst Evol 300, 1261–1268 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00606-013-0959-7

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Keywords

  • Bamboo flowering
  • Bambusa vulgaris
  • Dendrocalamus manipureanus
  • Phylogenetic analysis
  • Sporogenesis
  • Pollen