Microchimica Acta

, Volume 184, Issue 3, pp 871–878

Heterogeneity in the fluorescence of graphene and graphene oxide quantum dots

  • Siobhan J. Bradley
  • Renee Kroon
  • Geoffry Laufersky
  • Magnus Röding
  • Renee V. Goreham
  • Tina Gschneidtner
  • Kathryn Schroeder
  • Kasper Moth-Poulsen
  • Mats Andersson
  • Thomas Nann
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00604-017-2075-9

Cite this article as:
Bradley, S.J., Kroon, R., Laufersky, G. et al. Microchim Acta (2017) 184: 871. doi:10.1007/s00604-017-2075-9

Abstract

Heterogeneity is an inherent property of a wealth of real-world nanomaterials and yet rarely in the reporting of new properties is its effect sufficiently addressed. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) – fluorescent, nanoscale fragments of graphene - are an extreme example of a heterogeneous nanomaterial. Here, top-down approaches – by far the most predominant – produce batches of particles with a distribution of sizes, shapes, extent of oxidation, chemical impurities and more. This makes characterization of these materials using bulk techniques particularly complex and comparisons of properties across different synthetic methods uninformative. In particular, it hinders the understanding of the structural origin of their fluorescence properties. We present a simple synthetic method, which produces graphene quantum dots with very low oxygen content that can be suspended in organic solvents, suggesting a very pristine material. We use this material to illustrate the limitations of interpreting complex data sets generated by heterogeneous materials and we highlight how misleading this “pristine” interpretation is by comparison with graphene oxide quantum dots synthesized using an established protocol. In addition, we report on the solvatochromic properties of these particles, discuss common characterization techniques and their limitations in attributing properties to heterogeneous materials.

Graphical abstract

Graphene quantum dots with very low oxygen content were synthesized using a simple method, suggesting a very pristine material. We highlight how misleading this “pristine” term is when applied to a heterogeneous material through comparison with graphene oxide quantum dots.

Keywords

Graphene quantum dots Quantum yield Fluorescence lifetime Photoluminescence Characterization TEM NMR Raman spectroscopy 

Supplementary material

604_2017_2075_MOESM1_ESM.docx (1.8 mb)
ESM 1(DOCX 1883 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siobhan J. Bradley
    • 1
  • Renee Kroon
    • 2
  • Geoffry Laufersky
    • 1
  • Magnus Röding
    • 3
  • Renee V. Goreham
    • 1
  • Tina Gschneidtner
    • 2
  • Kathryn Schroeder
    • 1
  • Kasper Moth-Poulsen
    • 2
  • Mats Andersson
    • 2
    • 4
  • Thomas Nann
    • 1
  1. 1.The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical SciencesVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  2. 2.Chalmers University of TechnologyGöteborgSweden
  3. 3.SP Food & Bioscience, Structure and Material DesignGöteborgSweden
  4. 4.FI InstituteUniversity of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia

Personalised recommendations